'We should consider every day lost on which we have not danced at least once. And we should call every truth false which was not accompanied by at least one laugh.'—Friedrich Nietzsche


++++++++++++++++++
++ 12, November 21st ++
+++++++++++++++++++
A Party
++
++ Tom Cohen,"Polemos: ‘I am at war with myself’ or, Deconstruction™ in the Anthropocene?," The Oxford Literary Review 34.2 (2012): 239–257.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
p.239—'I have simultaneously — I ask you to believe me on this — the double feeling that, on the one hand, to put it playfully and with a certain immodesty, one has not yet begun to read me... in the end it is later on that all this has a chance of appearing; but also, on the other hand, and thus smultaneously, I have the feeling that two weeks or a month after my death there will be noting left. Nothing except what has been copyrighted and deposited in libraries. I swear to you, I believe sincerely and simultanously in these two hypotheses.¶ Jacques Derrida, "Learning to Live Finally — the Last Interview" '

'I am at war wth myself (contre moi-meme), it's true, you doulcn't possibly know to what extent, beyond what you can guess.¶ Jacques Derrida, "Learning to Life Finally — the Last Interview" '

'Two words haunt any ecologically attuned consideration of the historical hour in which our increasingly globalized world currently finds itself: one... is "anthropocene"; the other, lurking as a grim potential, or even an unfolding reality, within the notion of the anthropocene is "ecocide".¶ Kate Rigby, "Writing in the Anthropocene" '

p.240—Chiral 'Derridas'—on the other hand—'...the planetary collision mimes the cinematic arrival of the term anthropocene—or what I will call one of its two antipodal poles of non-sense.'

'Arriving from an ejaculation at a geologist's forum by Paul Crutzman, it seems the epitome of antrhopomorphism itself—irradiating with a secred pride invoking comments on our god-like powers and ownership of "the planet." It is not surprising, then, that in the term's viral marketing its emerging appropriation is visible already.'

p.241—'But the term anthropocene is a placeholder, non-semantic, a non-word and non-name that does not adhere to any binarised sense and cannot be deconstructed. It cannot not evoke all the metonymic depredatinos involved in irreversible global warming, resource wards, and even exponentially leveraged hyperfinance and megadebt, not to mention projections of "population culling" to come. Even its "time" is plastic, since it above all marks the time at which it emerges as a speech act (or marketable branfard, gratis Crutzman).'

p.242—'....Holocene..."humanualism"...'

p.243—'From the perspective of the anthropocene the true "rogue" Derrida was the one who, through a calculation of canonical survival, responded to the urging of the 90's cadre to write as if to "ethics," to "religion", to "politics"—or maintain the labyrinth of "hospitality" with the pathos of undecidability as a rhetorical bait.'

p.245—'One wonders that his services or helpers were so entranced by the routine that they had failed the ecocidal, being stuch rather in a backloop. This occlusion appears, rather, rhetorically endemic. Why?'

p.246—'The treatment of Nancy in On Touching is, in this regard, signal and brutal.'

p.249–50—The Cinanthropocene—an 'art of diversion'—'The unabridgeable rift between the two Derridas ("I" at war contre "myself") accords with a rift today within the fading meme of "deconstruction" as a franchise. On the one hand, there would be a "deconstruction" busy tending to the proper name, obsessively, dutifully, yielding a soft Derrideanism without deconstruction. Deconstruction™. And on the other hand, there is what might be called a deconstruction without "deconstruction" in so far as the anthropocene alleviates and rereads the former—selectively and aggressively. What rises to the surface in the name of the J.D. at war with "Derrida," and what ceases to be relevant to this new referential horizon? Do writings marginal t the angelicists, corporatists, academic archivists and one-time contemporaneity seekers float to the fore? That is, not the writings on "archive," but on khora; not the work on "the animal," but on humanualism; not the rhetorician of mourning, hospitality, spectrality, sovereignty, and the "otherness of te other" but another polemicists, at war with these.'

p.250–51—''When one surveys the theoretical landscape of 2012 and examines the state f philosophy or the Humanities acros the global academy, one might well ask the question: what has deconstruction been doing [since 2004]?... [I]t has been with remarkable speed that deconstruction as a topic has fallen off the theoretical agenda... relegated to a side show in the carnival of Theory today... If deconstruction is to reclaim the ground it has lost in the graduate imaginary since the death of Derrida then it will have to engage with and challenge that agenda... a risk that no one in deconstruction seems willing to take at this moment... [T]he question might be asked: what will deconstruction be prepared to sacrifice in order to survive?"—McQuillan, Deconstruction without Derrida (2012)

'Enter, the "anthropocene". This term or non-name arrives in a tangle of forces without any appeal to sovereignty. It has turned the current geopolitical and geo-economic climate into a paralyzsed network of zombie systems (in denial) angling for momentary advantage before the next reset hit: Euro-collapse? Methane bubbles from the tundra? Oceanic acidification?—the menu is suddenly endless.'


+++++++++++++++++++
++ 11, November 14th ++
+++++++++++++++++++
Faciality and Minor Literatures
READ ONE OF THESE COMBINATIONS IN THE ORDER GIVEN:
- 1, 2, 4
- 3 (Intro and Chapter 3 if you must select), 4, 2
++
++ 1—Benson, Peter, and Kevin Lewis O'neill, "Facing Risk: Levinas, Ethnography, and Ethics," Anthropology of Consciousness 18/2 (2007).
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


++
++ 2—Benson, Peter, "EL CAMPO: Faciality and Structural Violence in Farm Labor Camps," Cultural Anthropology 23/4 (2008):589–629.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


++
++ 3—Deleuze, Gilles, and Felix Guattari, "Kafka: Toward a Minor Literature", Theory and History of Literature 30, University of Minnesota Press.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


++
++ 4—Ochoa, Todd Ramon, "Versions of the Dead: Kalunga, Cuban-Kongo Materiality, and Ethnography," Cultural Antrhopology 22/4 (2007):473–500.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

++
++ Raffel, Stanley, "If Goffman Had Read Levinas," Journal of Classical Sociology 2/2 (2002).
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


+++++++++++++++++++++
++ 10.5, November 11th ++
+++++++++++++++++++++
#cyberBullying

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=====David Allen=====
Yesterday

#cyberBullying #shitGradStudentsSay (is it wrong for me to hope this one goes viral?)


  • Dan Lyles
  • November 9 near Troy, NY via mobile

  • Here is how you trap someone's mind with work (an advanced technique).

  • 1. Give the worker a stack of tasks that must be completed in order to receive sustenance.
  • 2. Give the worker flexibility to choose their schedule and what tasks they work on in order ...


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Db Banks · Friends with Sam Harrington and 25 othersI don't really know you and this is really fuckin' creepy.
Yesterday at 1:45am via mobile · Unlike · 2
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David Allen The feeling is mutual.
Yesterday at 1:51am · Like
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David Allen #postIntellectualDiscourse
Yesterday at 7:23am via mobile · Like
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David Allen #cultMentality
Yesterday at 8:47am · Like
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Neale Johnson "Dan Lyles WHY DON'T YOU DO SOMETHING IN THE WORLD INSTEAD OF JUST TALKING ABOUT IT?"

    • A bit ironic coming from individuals who were engaging in this exact behavior themselves. I mean, it is a valid choice to simply question the world around you even if you have no solutions, but when someone confronts you with a reality, one they have experience in, maybe it is time for self-reflection. On the topic of anarchic, idealistic viewpoints are attractive and can fun to engage in during discourses, but there is neither proof of a truly functioning anarchic society nor enough evidence to conclude whether it will work. There is however more than enough evidence that being a boss doesn't simply boil down to extracting work when people don't know they are doing it.

    • Based on workplace satisfaction, superior management skills, and being fulfilled by the work itself, bosses can find themselves more productive just based on what they are doing at their jobs. I won't accuse anyone of being a poor employee, but people who generally have a hard time functioning in a workplace where things are expected and lack of progress is not tolerated are generally those who rebel against the system. Though a type of a workplace like this can produce undesired stress, it's work noting that stress is a good motivator. How many people find the looming deadline a reason to to cracking down on work they need to get down. After all, from an evolutionary standpoint both stress and society make sense. Perhaps the bureaucracy of it all is daunting to those who feel trapped by it, but it isn't impossible to impose self-exile even in this day and age.

    • Sorry for rambling, but there seems to be a rather aggressive culture with these ideologies which is quite scary (and isn;t really working out for them to be frank).
Yesterday at 8:59am · Unlike · 2
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David Allen No worries. That last sentence of yours is pretty much what I was trying to communicate with Dan and friends. #EPICfail.
Yesterday at 9:05am · Like · 1
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Dan Lyles I resent this move to recast yourself as some kind of victim. I resent you taking this conversation and trying to recontextualize it as though you have been unfairly maligned. You come into our spaces, both physical and virtual, you feel entitled to say whatever racist or sexist thing you want and to smugly interrogate anyone who you think isn't taking your personal feelings into account. When we, who have received this treatment from you and people like you for far too long before, band together and defend ourselves and to tell you that we don't care for it, you have the audacity to call us bullies because we don't affirm your need to be important in our discussions?

    • It's dishonest and insincere, and I think the people you're trying to gain sympathy from should know that.
Yesterday at 9:30am · Unlike · 5
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David Allen Thank you for, once again, proving my point.
Yesterday at 9:32am · Like
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David Allen Just because I disagree with your methods of fighting for racial and sexual equality, it does not mean I am saying sexist and racist things.
Yesterday at 9:34am · Like
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David Allen If there was any way I could show that to you, I would. It seems like you're so set in your hatred, however, that anyone who suggests a different approach to fighting for social issues is against you.
Yesterday at 9:36am · Like
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David Allen I really wish you the best in your search for justice. And if there is any way that you would suggest I could be your ally, I am all ears.
Yesterday at 9:37am · Like
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Db Banks · Friends with Sam Harrington and 25 othersJust for the record- everyone under imperialist white supremacist capitalist patriarchy is racist and sexist. You have to actively try to negate those social phenomena speaking through you and, as a general rule, you should let others judge whether how well you are doing. I hope you have a long and fulfilling life of condescendingly quoting MLK Jr. to black people.
Yesterday at 10:03am · Unlike · 3
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David Allen Does this include you?
Yesterday at 10:04am · Like
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David Allen I honestly wasn't quoting MLK Jr. condescendingly.
Yesterday at 10:05am · Like
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David Allen I was deeply moved by that speech, and I don't think that makes me a racist.
Yesterday at 10:06am · Like
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Db Banks · Friends with Sam Harrington and 25 othersNo that doesn't include me. I live on an astral plane different from you mere mortals. Your social phenomena are of no concern to me. http://gph.is/13EDUpc
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Zod Animated GIF - Tv GIFs - GiphyThe best Zod GIFs are on Giphy

Yesterday at 10:07am · Unlike · 2 · Remove Preview
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David Allen At some point, I hope you guys realize that I am simply trying to suggest a different way to go about discussing social issues. One that is inclusive and does not immediately ostracize and exclude others from the conversation.
Yesterday at 10:07am · Like
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David Allen Hey. At least you're willing to admit it.
Yesterday at 10:08am · Like
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David Allen You know, by attacking me here again, you guys are further deepening the gap between us and proving the bullying part of this conversation.
Yesterday at 10:09am · Like
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David Allen I would like to add Ecovative to the list of corporations that don't suck... with owners and managers that are working towards the betterment of society and the world at large. Could you please spare Ecovative and the BBC when you decide to strangle all the beurocrats with the guts of capitalists? Should NPR be on this list as well? Pretty sure they're a corporation.
Yesterday at 10:20am · Like
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David Allen As for nation-states, I'll have to do a bit more research. I'm not really all that happy with the way things are here in the USA, but I don't really have much experience with Japan, Denmark, Canada, and others which might be closer to governments that have it right.
Yesterday at 10:23am · Like
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James Birmingham · Friends with Dan Lyles and 10 othersall states are failed states

    • calling this bullying is a disservice to legitimate bullying claims
Yesterday at 10:39am · Unlike · 5
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David Allen What is bullying aside from ostracizing someone for being different than you? Also, looks like NPR is actually a non-profit media entity. Are those spared from your anarchist revolution?
Yesterday at 10:40am · Like
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David Allen bul·ly1
    • ˈbo͝olē/Submit
    • verb
    • gerund or present participle: bullying
    • 1.
    • use superior strength or influence to intimidate (someone), typically to force him or her to do what one wants.
    • "a local man was bullied into helping them"
    • synonyms: persecute, oppress, tyrannize, browbeat, harass, torment, intimidate, strong-arm, dominate; More
Yesterday at 10:42am · Like
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David Allen Google it bro.
Yesterday at 10:42am · Like
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James Birmingham · Friends with Dan Lyles and 10 othersarguing with someone on someone else's fb status neither delves into your personal space nor ostracizes you from anywhere with the possble exception of /someone elses/ fb wall. if you brought this case to anyone calling it bullying it'd be struck down immediately
Yesterday at 10:46am · Edited · Unlike · 1
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James Birmingham · Friends with Dan Lyles and 10 othersin an anarchist society we wouldnt need the extant nonprofit model
Yesterday at 10:45am · Unlike · 1
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David Allen You guys aren't just arguing. You're labeling, attacking and belittling my statements. There's a difference between respectful and passionate debate and what you guys are doing. And you did it in our Post-Structuralist class as well.
Yesterday at 10:46am · Like
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David Allen The evidence is mounting, so please continue.
Yesterday at 10:47am · Like
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James Birmingham · Friends with Dan Lyles and 10 othersalso no one tried to get you to do anything you didnt want to do - insulting someone in one conversation is not bullying them - if it was repeated after being asked to stop it might be harassment.

    • the only one who has repeated this conversation is you - in fact hoping this goes viral in order to denigrate us is as strong a case for bullying though i doubt any of us would take it like that
Yesterday at 10:48am · Unlike · 1
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Db Banks · Friends with Sam Harrington and 25 othersYeah I was contemplating going there and now I think I'm gonna.

    • The fact that, as Dan already said and you ignored, you come into our spaces and interrogate everyone to the point of exhaustion and call that bullying is revolting. I won't explain or recount the awful things that happen to (especially young women) victims of bullying because I am actually going to respect you for a second and assume that your work in video games has made you aware of the suicides and self-mutilations that often come with relentless harassment. Completely sincere: If we've pushed you to have dangerous thoughts or triggered you in some way I deeply apologize and I hope that you have a support network and access to professionals that can help you get through that.
Yesterday at 10:48am · Unlike · 2
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Db Banks · Friends with Sam Harrington and 25 othersAnd when I say "respect you for a second" I mean that I'll return to respecting your opinions which disappeared somewhere around the Zod gif.
Yesterday at 10:50am · Unlike · 1
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James Birmingham · Friends with Dan Lyles and 10 othersattacking someone else's ideas is how academia works - if you dont like it i suggest not engaging with academia
Yesterday at 10:50am · Unlike · 2
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James Birmingham · Friends with Dan Lyles and 10 othersthere is a world of difference between attacking an idea and attacking a person
Yesterday at 10:50am · Unlike · 2
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David Allen Yes. Like calling someone a ding-dong versus actually engaging them in the debate.
Yesterday at 10:51am · Like
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Db Banks · Friends with Sam Harrington and 25 othersDing dong cuts deep.
Yesterday at 10:52am · Unlike · 2
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Db Banks · Friends with Sam Harrington and 25 othersto the bone
Yesterday at 10:52am · Unlike · 1
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James Birmingham · Friends with Dan Lyles and 10 othersi wont speak for others - but i do not think i once attacked you rather than something you said in the convo above - proof of otherwise?

    • i dont appreciate being called a bully when i didnt bully
Yesterday at 10:52am · Unlike · 1
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James Birmingham · Friends with Dan Lyles and 10 otherscalling me a bully is also name calling dude
Yesterday at 10:53am · Unlike · 1
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David Allen How else would you describe high-fiving someone for making fun of someone else?
Yesterday at 10:53am · Like
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James Birmingham · Friends with Dan Lyles and 10 othersi explained that in class - were you listening?
Yesterday at 10:53am · Unlike · 1
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David Allen Yes.
Yesterday at 10:54am · Like
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David Allen And it still didn't feel any less like bullying.
Yesterday at 10:54am · Like
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David Allen Maybe bully is the wrong term. Is there a more appropriate term for someone engaging in the mass-shaming of another individual for a difference in beliefs?
Yesterday at 10:55am · Like
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James Birmingham · Friends with Dan Lyles and 10 othersi whole heartedly agreed that if such an assertion was true that we should kill ourselves - seriously - thus the high five
Yesterday at 10:55am · Unlike · 1
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James Birmingham · Friends with Dan Lyles and 10 othersdiffuse sanctions
Yesterday at 10:55am · Unlike · 1
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David Allen You mean activities "that encourage and emphasize conformity to social and customary norms or rules"?
Yesterday at 10:56am · Like
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David Allen I seriously just pulled that off the web, so you'll have to correct me if I've got it wrong.
Yesterday at 10:57am · Like
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James Birmingham · Friends with Dan Lyles and 10 othersi think it is a silly thing to talk about in a grad school seminar - a space where historically these sort of debates are the norm, but yes diffuse sanctions is sometimes using shame to shape peoples actions
Yesterday at 10:58am · Unlike · 1
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James Birmingham · Friends with Dan Lyles and 10 otherse.g. calling somone out for using racist terms in order to curb their use of racists terms - pretty easy to understand
Yesterday at 10:59am · Unlike · 1
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David Allen Yes. But what makes you an authority on what is and isn't racist?
Yesterday at 11:00am · Like
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David Allen And what makes you feel that just because I am disagreeing with you, that what I am saying must be racist or sexist?
Yesterday at 11:00am · Like
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James Birmingham · Friends with Dan Lyles and 10 othersthat isnt the point at all - i am just giving an example of a diffuse sanction - I am not talking about you or i right now i am explaining what diffuse sanctions is
Yesterday at 11:01am · Unlike · 1
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David Allen Well, lets get back to specifics about this conversation then. What is it that you were sanctioning diffusely in the classroom?
Yesterday at 11:02am · Like
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David Allen What is it that you et al were diffuse sanctioning in Dan Lyles' post?
Yesterday at 11:02am · Like
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David Allen And what makes you an authority to do so?
Yesterday at 11:02am · Like
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James Birmingham · Friends with Dan Lyles and 10 otherslike i said i think it is a silly term to use in that context - but you asked for a term besides bullying to talk about shame being used to curb behavior
Yesterday at 11:03am · Unlike · 1
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David Allen Well, what term would you use instead?
Yesterday at 11:03am · Like
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James Birmingham · Friends with Dan Lyles and 10 othersan argument - both of these cases were arguments
Yesterday at 11:03am · Unlike · 1
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David Allen Were they effective?
Yesterday at 11:04am · Like
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David Allen Did you somehow manage to win people over to your side of the argument?
Yesterday at 11:04am · Like
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David Allen People who weren't already there to begin with?
Yesterday at 11:04am · Like
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David Allen That is the big question I am trying to ask you guys. But none of you have tried to answer it.
Yesterday at 11:05am · Like
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James Birmingham · Friends with Dan Lyles and 10 othersyour beef with each is that they did not meet your standards of civility - we disagree on what those standards should be. you are no more an authority on what they should be than i
Yesterday at 11:05am · Unlike · 1
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James Birmingham · Friends with Dan Lyles and 10 othersit assumes that my purpose is converting others to my beliefs. it isn't
Yesterday at 11:05am · Like
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David Allen Fair enough. Than you really don't want an anarchist revolution?
Yesterday at 11:06am · Like
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James Birmingham · Friends with Dan Lyles and 10 othersthis isnt a competition for me - i am not trying to convince anyone
Yesterday at 11:07am · Edited · Unlike · 1
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James Birmingham · Friends with Dan Lyles and 10 otherslol not in the way youre framing it - and no not with new converts - not my project
Yesterday at 11:07am · Unlike · 1
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David Allen This isn't a competition for me either. I'm actually looking to collaborate. But instead of finding allies in you, Dan, and other activists, I'm finding close-minded individuals who are willing to browbeat anyone who disagrees with their point of view.
Yesterday at 11:07am · Like
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James Birmingham · Friends with Dan Lyles and 10 othersi am not interested in collaborating with liberals.

    • deciding who i work with based on my tastes is not bullying.
Yesterday at 11:08am · Unlike · 1
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David Allen You're not just deciding to not collaborate with me. You're actively attacking me for my ideas.
Yesterday at 11:09am · Like
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James Birmingham · Friends with Dan Lyles and 10 othersno i attacked your ideas not you
Yesterday at 11:09am · Unlike · 1
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David Allen You mean by calling me a "liberal" in a derogatory way?
Yesterday at 11:12am · Like
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James Birmingham · Friends with Dan Lyles and 10 othersi mean it is derogatory insofar as i am against liberalism?

    • the closest ive come to insulting you is calling you apathetic

    • youve called me a bully

    • i think youve done more name calling than i have here yo
Yesterday at 11:14am · Edited · Unlike · 1
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David Allen And "i hate pretty much everyone" doesn't mean anything either? You said you hate me, indirectly, but you did.
Yesterday at 11:17am · Like
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David Allen Because you're ganging up on me.
Yesterday at 11:17am · Like
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James Birmingham · Friends with Dan Lyles and 10 othersoh jfc there is no way your sarcasm detector is that low
Yesterday at 11:17am · Unlike · 1
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David Allen If you engaged my ideas, I'd be ok with that. But you're not. You're comparing my thinking to the kind of thinking that allowed the Nazis, and taking every chance you get to position yourself as intellectually superior.
Yesterday at 11:18am · Like
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James Birmingham · Friends with Dan Lyles and 10 otherswhich idea do you wish me to engage with? i engaged with your statement that you'd never complain about a system by calling that out as apathy - i stand by that.

    • your rebuttal was that systems that were enabled by apathy had more to do with economic causes - which really had little to do with my statement
Yesterday at 11:20am · Unlike · 1
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David Allen And I simply disagreed with your statement that Nazism was caused by apathy. It actually had more to do with the desperation that was born out of the debt of reparations that were forced on Germany in the treaty of versailles. The Nazi culture, ideology, and belief in racial superiority was only a symptom used as rhetoric in public speeches. The real goal was to pull Germany out of despair, and—granted I am not the most qualified to comment on this—I believe that most germans were simply desperate to get out of the hole they found themselves in.
Yesterday at 11:27am · Like
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David Allen Whats more, I believe we have a similar situation here in the USA.
Yesterday at 11:28am · Like
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David Allen One that is just as desperate.
Yesterday at 11:28am · Like
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James Birmingham · Friends with Dan Lyles and 10 othersHow about the apathy of other governments? the apathy displayed in the face of the horrors of a holocaust
Yesterday at 11:29am · Unlike · 1
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James Birmingham · Friends with Dan Lyles and 10 othersthat is more what i was referencing

    • but okay we disagree on the causal origins of nazism

    • were not the first

    • read like any two history books on the topic
Yesterday at 11:29am · Unlike · 1
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David Allen That wasn't apathy from the government. That was fascism and business interfering with government. IBM, Coca Cola, and all of the other corporations that were profiting by doing business with Germany had a huge amount of influence on the government.
Yesterday at 11:30am · Like
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James Birmingham · Friends with Dan Lyles and 10 othersyoure just talking about the US right now really
Yesterday at 11:30am · Unlike · 1
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David Allen And I feel that is the real reason why the US was so hesitant in joining the war effort.
Yesterday at 11:30am · Like
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David Allen Yes.
Yesterday at 11:31am · Like
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David Allen I'm hoping at some point you guys realize that I'm not attacking you guys. I'm not threatening you and your beliefs. I'm simply questioning the way in which you are sharing them and whether or not your strategies of delivery are effective in building your (and what I would also like to consider my) movements.
Yesterday at 11:33am · Edited · Like
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James Birmingham · Friends with Dan Lyles and 10 othersi sometimes get death threats so i dont feel attacked

    • i am however pretty annoyed at being called a bully for silly reasons
Yesterday at 11:34am · Unlike · 1
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James Birmingham · Friends with Dan Lyles and 10 othersi am not interested in liberal assessment of my political work - i am sorry if that hurts your feelings
Yesterday at 11:35am · Unlike · 2
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David Allen Sorry. If you were to stop ganging up on me in class and take a risk trying defend my right to speak my mind, I'd likely stop feeling like you're bullying me.
Yesterday at 11:35am · Like
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James Birmingham · Friends with Dan Lyles and 10 othersi am the only one in this convo currently in that class and i do not think this is an appropriate venue for that discussion. maybe bring this up /in class/?
Yesterday at 11:36am · Unlike · 1
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David Allen I did. And that didn't go very far now, did it?
Yesterday at 11:38am · Like
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David Allen Behavior like this needs sunlight.
Yesterday at 11:39am · Like
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James Birmingham · Friends with Dan Lyles and 10 othersjust for the record though one day of class being shitty for you does no constitute bullying either - bullying requires repetition
Yesterday at 11:39am · Unlike · 1
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David Allen Like here on facebook?
Yesterday at 11:39am · Like
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David Allen That would be something now, wouldn't it?
Yesterday at 11:40am · Like
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David Allen I'll keep an eye out for it and let you know when that happens.
Yesterday at 11:40am · Like
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James Birmingham · Friends with Dan Lyles and 10 othersok fine.

    • if what i am doing now is bullying to you i will not further question your subjective experience

    • i will simply 'defriend' you and stop having these conversations with you - since i do not want to bully you

    • later
Yesterday at 11:43am · Unlike · 1
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Britney Sg · Friends with Dan Lyles and 16 othersIf your ability to speak in class is regularly being curtailed by your peers--you're being talked over, you're being interrupted, etc--then you have several options. The first is to address this with your peers. If this is ineffective, address it with the professor. If neither of these parties is interested in helping you to improve this situation, then I strongly you suggest you reconsider the value of your contributions in seminar. I have been in countless discussion based seminars and about 99% of the time, if someone's ability to contribute is being curtailed it is because their contributions are not useful to the discussion, either because they derail the conversation or because they are deeply problematic. Try to remember that you are working with professional academics, and they are not shutting you down to hurt your fee-fees but because they take serious issue with the ideas you are expressing. And I think several people have tried to explain why your contributions are seriously problematic and you have ignored them outright or explained them away, and that is probably a serious part of the problem.
Yesterday at 11:43am · Unlike · 2
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David Allen Done, done, and now I'm bringing it to the open for what it is.

    • First, let's be clear. My contributions are not being "talked over", they're being berated and called "stupid" (Ben Brucato), "Liberal" (James Brimingham), "slimy", and "ding-dong"-ish (Dan Lyles). I find it hard to believe that this is the behavior of "professional academics" as you call them.

    • If this are the best responses that the nation's brightest young minds have to offer, it's no wonder the country is in the shape it is in. Is it possible that the nation is in the current state that it is in because of your exclusion of the people who are in systems you are criticizing in your discussions?
Yesterday at 11:51am · Like
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Britney Sg · Friends with Dan Lyles and 16 othersYou're right, I'm sure everyone else is the problem, not you at all. Way to deflect any criticism whatsoever. I'm sure everyone else is just a big meany head and you've done everything right. jfc
Yesterday at 11:53am via mobile · Unlike · 1
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David Allen Is your condescension getting you anywhere in this conversation?
Yesterday at 11:55am · Like
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David Allen Or were you just piping in to get another jab in there?
Yesterday at 11:55am · Like
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Britney Sg · Friends with Dan Lyles and 16 othersNo, I was genuinely trying to be helpful to you in understanding what is at work here, and you once again deflected and refused to think critically about your own behavior. You equated behavior in a seminar with behavior on Facebook (which is a completely different environment and an unfair equivalence) and once again made it about yourself and your feelings. as for where it is getting me, away at this point. good luck to you.
Yesterday at 11:57am · Unlike · 1
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David Allen I stand by my beliefs and statements. And I stand by the claim that the reaction I received from the students in the STS department (not direct peers, but people I was branching out to connect with) has been disproportionate to the expression of my ideas. If you guys can't see how you're excluding the very people that need your engagement, that's on you.
Yesterday at 11:57am · Like
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David Allen And thank you for the sarcastic luck.
Yesterday at 11:58am · Like
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Britney Sg · Friends with Dan Lyles and 16 othersUh it was definitely sincere. wtf?
Yesterday at 11:59am · Unlike · 1
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David Allen Sorry. Everyone else got me riled up.
Yesterday at 12:07pm · Like
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David Allen If you are genuinely trying to help, would you be willing to do so by talking to Dan and others about the way they treated me? Labels and all?
Yesterday at 12:08pm · Like
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David Allen That is honestly, the one thing that WOULD make me feel better.
Yesterday at 12:08pm · Like
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Britney Sg · Friends with Dan Lyles and 16 othersDid you read what I wrote? Trying to make this about others' treatment of you IS THE PROBLEM. I think you have already expressed your dislike of how they labelled you. The only help that I can offer is to encourage you critically reflect on your behavior, specifically your smugness and condescension, and consider the extent to which that elicits certain (undesirable for you) responses. you're acting like all of this is some kind of force of nature that is outside of your control. To demand that someone explain their politics to you, then to be dissatisfied with their answer and demand that they be more persuasive or less radical or more sensitive is incredibly entitled and patronizing.
Yesterday at 12:13pm · Unlike · 3
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David Allen You said condescension twice now in relation to my behavior... having come into this conversation by talking to me about what I might be doing wrong... and asking me to self-reflect, all of which are things that I am asking of Dan Lyles et all. So, I'm a little confused as to what you're getting at. If anything, that is what this entire discussion is all about. The fact that I was looking to ask Dan about his broad dark statements and justify them, suggesting a counter-point based on my own experience. And instead of self-reflecting and questioning his beliefs and statements, and the people he is excluding from the conversation, he attacked me. I'm not sure how much of this conversation you have read, but it's pretty clear what is going on here.
Yesterday at 12:18pm · Like
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David Allen It's confusing to hear you ask me to do something that you and your friends have so far been incapable of doing.
Yesterday at 12:20pm · Like
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David Allen I'm happy to announce that James Burmingham has, indeed, unfriended me
Yesterday at 12:23pm · Like
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Britney Sg · Friends with Dan Lyles and 16 othersIf i had six different people telling me to check myself, you're damn right I would. If i had a classroom full of people (something I have experienced several times) telling me that the shit spewing from my mouth was stupid, i would (and have) take a very large and long step back and try to figure out where I went wrong. and yes, i have read both of these conversations in entirety. and I am telling you that you have come into another person's space and condescended to them, and when they defend themselves you call cyber-bullying (seriously not cool) and demand that they further explain themselves to you. so you obviously are not interested in reconsidering how your behavior has provoked these responses, and that's fine with me bc i have no shits to give for that, but it boggles my mind that you can have a room (physical or digital) full of people telling you to check your shit and still think that you're in the right and they're in the wrong. honestly, it's kind of impressive.
Yesterday at 12:24pm · Unlike · 2
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David Allen I'm happy that I have made at least one positive impression on you. Thank you for that!
Yesterday at 12:25pm · Like
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David Allen Might have just made my day.
Yesterday at 12:25pm · Like
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David Allen The thing that has kept me going in this conversation is courage, actually. The courage of standing up to others who are doing something that they themselves would criticize if the shoe was on the other foot. If it was a group of capitalists picking on one of them, they would have a problem with it. But because it is them doing the deed in the name of what they think it is right, they don't see the injustice of what they're doing.
Yesterday at 12:29pm · Like · 1
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David Allen http://www.rugusavay.com/.../12/Noam-Chomsky-Quotes-4.jpgexternal image safe_image.php?d=AQC5I3Y8Ch9zFs3z&w=210&h=210&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.rugusavay.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2012%2F12%2FNoam-Chomsky-Quotes-4.jpg
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Yesterday at 12:31pm · Like · Remove Preview
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Britney Sg · Friends with Dan Lyles and 16 othersit is absolutely hilarious that you see yourself as a victim of injustice in this. you have the biggest persecution complex I've ever seen. if being told you're wrong on facebook and getting called a ding-dong is the biggest injustice you face today, then you are living the dream.
Yesterday at 12:33pm · Unlike · 1
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David Allen Condescension coming from someone who is asking someone else to not be condescending is hilarious too.
Yesterday at 12:35pm · Edited · Like
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Britney Sg · Friends with Dan Lyles and 16 othersyep. all of this happened in a void. nothing to do with how you set the tone for all of this. not at all. (now I am being condescending)
Yesterday at 12:36pm · Unlike · 2
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David Allen Happy to know that you're finally willing to admit it.
Yesterday at 12:36pm · Like
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David Allen Thing is you started from your very first post with it, and it's taken you this long to self-reflect.
Yesterday at 12:37pm · Like
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Britney Sg · Friends with Dan Lyles and 16 othersno, i always knew i was being condescending. that tone had already been set long before i showed up.
Yesterday at 12:39pm · Unlike · 1
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David Allen I see. What is your platform for asking me not to be then? What foundation of dignity and superiority were you building from to suggest that I should self-reflect?
Yesterday at 12:40pm · Like
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David Allen Or were you just jumping on the bandwagon of "hate" that Dan, James, et al started?
Yesterday at 12:42pm · Like
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Britney Sg · Friends with Dan Lyles and 16 otherswhy one earth would i answer any more of your questions when it is very clear that you are right and nothing in heaven or on earth could change that? you can call me a hater and a bully, thats totally fine with me, but i am definitely done wasting my time engaging with someone who clearly only wants to prove their moral superiority.
Yesterday at 12:47pm · Unlike · 2
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David Allen Clearly.
Yesterday at 12:47pm · Like
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James Birmingham · Friends with Dan Lyles and 10 othersSorry cant help myself here. Chomsky is an anarchist.
Yesterday at 2:13pm via mobile · Edited · Unlike · 5
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David Allen Absolutely. And one that champions being open to other people's right to freely express their points of view, and to defending people who are being publicly attacked by others. That is why I posted that. And I did NOT post it ironically.
9 hours ago · Like
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Britney Sg · Friends with Dan Lyles and 16 othersLol tell that to Zizek, whom Chomsky has publicly eviscerated several times for his shenanigans.
8 hours ago via mobile · Unlike · 1
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David Allen I thought you were done wasting time on me. Are you back to re-engage?
8 hours ago · Edited · Like
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David Allen This is not going to go over well with Britney, Dan, and James. I know this, and I am posting it anyway because it illustrates the type of bullying you guys are doling out if you'd really like to know: http://www.corrections.com/...—Take a look at the descriptions underneath "Together", and "Intellectual".

    • Having said this, I am also guilty of one of these (and I am ready to admit the possibility since it is something I am aware of and fight against as much as possible)—"Obnoxious" bullying. I know it's a problem, and I'm really sorry for letting it get out of control from time-to-time. So I am sorry for offending you guys with obnoxiousness.external image safe_image.php?d=AQC_NQW_5E5UTTQV&w=154&h=154&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.corrections.com%2Fimages%2Fcorrectsource_logo.gifRanking Bully Types – The Points Systemwww.corrections.com
4 hours ago · Like · Remove Preview
    • David Allen
      David Allen











external image 1076763_680657196_1357345670_q.jpg=====David Allen shared a link.=====



+++++++++++++++++++++
++ 10.1, November 11th ++
+++++++++++++++++++++
#shitGradStudentsSay (is it wrong to hope this one goes viral?)

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=====Dan Lyles=====
November 9 near Troy, NY via mobile

Here is how you trap someone's mind with work (an advanced technique).


  • 1. Give the worker a stack of tasks that must be completed in order to receive sustenance.
  • 2. Give the worker flexibility to choose their schedule and what tasks they work on in order to optimize their performance. Get them to believe this flexibility is their reward for taking on this much work.
  • 3. Subtly increase their workload. This has to be done gradually so that the worker doesn't notice. They will continue to optimize their schedule to make completion possible.
  • 4. Increase the work load until it is unconpleteable, but do not take away sustenance right away. The goal is to create a feeling of anxiety and paranoia in the person. Once the worker suspects that they might be in danger at any moment, they will work beyond their capacity out of fear.
  • 5. Randomly assign punishments for failing work. The goal is to punitive and arbitrary, but fully within the realm of believability. The worker must know you possess the power, but cannot know your logic.
  • 6. Profit.

  • And there you have it. Repeat as necessary. For us workers, it's best to assume we're already somewhere between 2 and 6 figure out where we are in this process so that we can start building tools of resistance.


Like ·



Gray Fisher word. illusion of choices. also the individualization/isolation of labor is an important fun factor
November 9 at 4:33pm · Like · 2
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Dan Lyles Most def. A bunch of work goes into isolating individuals and then getting them angrily distrustful of anyone who challenges their illusions. In that way, you get your workers to police each other and themselves.
November 9 at 5:00pm via mobile · Like · 4
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Jim de Seve Dan, you are scaring me.
19 hours ago · Like
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Dan Lyles It's a scary world out there. We shouldn't have to face it alone.
16 hours ago via mobile · Like · 1
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David Allen Is there a particular industry you have in mind for this comment? And have you run a company or lead a team of workers yourself? I ask because I have been working in the games, advertising and publishing industries for years, and have lead teams as large as 25 people and this is nothing like the thought processes that effective managers go through. What are your sources for this particularly dark outlook on the subject?
12 hours ago via mobile · Like
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Dan Lyles Maybe you're just a terrible boss and you don't know it? Like, a well meaning, hard working boss who confuses his individual experience at work with a structural system of labor extraction. Because that's what I see the most of- bosses who think of themselves as good guys because they're less bad than some other guy, but still participate in this structure of labor extraction and thus get offended and upset when people start to question the day to day business of… well… business. Because, really, the kind of guy who isn't taking advantage of the people who put their trust in him, the kind of boss who really isn't just kidding himself about how this whole work thing is a big joke, that boss? He doesn't get mad when the game gets called out.
4 hours ago · Like · 1
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David Allen That is entirely possible. But where is your opinion coming from? Why are you making these rather large assumptions and accusations? Do you have any experience being a team leader or any actual research? What are your reputable sources for this negative outlook you have on life?
4 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham tl;dr

    • hard to have a dark outlook on something as evil as capitalism
4 hours ago · Like · 1
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David Allen If you guys hate capitalism so much, why are you participating in it?
4 hours ago · Like
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David Allen What do you think facebook is?
4 hours ago · Like
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David Allen Why do you have computers, cell phones, and, well, pretty much everything else you own?
4 hours ago · Like
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Dan Lyles Opting out is a privilege given to the wealthy and the powerful.
4 hours ago · Like · 2
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James Birmingham lulz - if you guys hate the way the world is currently run then why do you participate in it? is that the questuion?
4 hours ago · Edited · Like · 1
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David Allen No.
4 hours ago · Like
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David Allen I disagree.
4 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham So I can participate in it and not capitalism somehow?
4 hours ago · Like
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David Allen Yes.
4 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham Elaborate
4 hours ago · Like · 1
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Dan Lyles Yes. Do.
4 hours ago · Like · 1
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David Allen Find an example of something else that works and participate in that instead.
4 hours ago · Like
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Dan Lyles I'm sitting with all these poor people who didn't know they could just opt out of being exploited.
4 hours ago · Like · 3
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James Birmingham Find a piece of land that isn't owned by a nation-state?
4 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham And then somehow occupy it?
4 hours ago · Like
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David Allen Sure.
4 hours ago · Like
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David Allen Why not?
4 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham Because no such place exists
4 hours ago · Like · 1
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James Birmingham Colonialism did a pretty thorough job
4 hours ago · Like · 1
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Dan Lyles They're working on our minds now. I gotta say- it's pretty effective.
4 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham they're doing a Fanonmenal job.
4 hours ago · Like · 2
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Dan Lyles Facebook Double Like.
4 hours ago · Like · 1
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James Birmingham (thank you, thank you, I'll be here all night)
4 hours ago · Like
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David Allen Than make one.
4 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham Make land? Without engaging in capitalism for the materials?
4 hours ago · Like
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Dan Lyles I can't. You yelled at us for using Facebook and computers and participating in capitalism when we didn't like it.
4 hours ago · Like
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David Allen People squat on previously owned land all the time. In NYC, they turned out to be million-dollar properties in the end.
4 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham I know all about NYC squatting - I've squatted. That isn't not engaging with capitalism trust me.
4 hours ago · Like · 1
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James Birmingham Dumpstering is engaging with capitalism too - just its refuse.
4 hours ago · Unlike · 1
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David Allen I still don't see you guys offering an alternative to the current way of doing things. Just hating.
4 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham Those building aren't unowned they're just abandoned.
4 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham lulz

    • google me bro
4 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham I work with the Institute for Anarchist Studies - I do things
4 hours ago · Edited · Like · 1
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David Allen Please elaborate.
4 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham I am in Boston right now at the Boston Anarchist Bookfairhaving just given a talk on fighting white supremacy.

4 hours ago · Edited · Like · 2
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Dan Lyles It must be pretty sweet to just complain that your ignorance of what others are doing is proof that we're not working hard enough. Do you get to complain when our alternate system doesn't meet your expectations?
4 hours ago · Edited · Like · 3
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James Birmingham also ftr squatters gave seen 0 bucks for unwillingly gentrifying those neighbourhoods so i am confused by the example
4 hours ago · Like
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David Allen Honestly, I don't see myself complaining about a system ever.
4 hours ago · Like
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Dan Lyles Must be nice.
4 hours ago · Like · 2
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David Allen It would be like complaining about the fact that I have to eat, sleep, and breathe just to stay alive.
4 hours ago · Like
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Allyn Lindsey I'm late to the conversation here, but the original post is right on the nose for a Fortune 500 company. I was once middle management at one of those. The way to break the cycle is to know the game that's being played. I was never policing my co-workers, I was policing my boss!
4 hours ago via mobile · Like
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James Birmingham I think that is a gross naturalization of politico-economic systems - it is attitudes like that which allowed for Nazism.
4 hours ago · Like · 2
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David Allen I agree. Getting to know how your boss works and learning how to manage them is honestly something that must be done. Otherwise, you're asking to be exploited.
4 hours ago · Like · 1
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David Allen I actually believe it was economic desperation that caused Nazism. Not ideologies.
4 hours ago · Like
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David Allen The ideologies were just a symptom of desperation.
4 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham I don't what the term ideology means when used like that - are you making a materialist argument that poverty leads to fascism?
4 hours ago · Edited · Like
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Dan Lyles Every time I've been asked to be the boss of people rather than working with them as equals, I've seen the whole experience as a drag. Being in placed in a position of power over others is nothing to be proud of, and more importantly, it's normalized as a way to interact because for the most part we don't think about it. Sure, policing the boss might be better than just going with the status quo, but it's a little gesture at best.
4 hours ago · Like
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David Allen Yes.
4 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham If you're a worker in a capitalist system you're being exploited - that is how it works.
4 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham So what explains places with worse poverty that aren't fascist?
4 hours ago · Like
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David Allen Example please.
4 hours ago · Like
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David Allen By the way, it's not poverty itself. I said economic desperation. Not poverty.
4 hours ago · Like
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Dan Lyles I don't see you engaging with the examples provided in the spirt of discussion. I mainly see you demanding them to derail people's arguments and ignoring them when they are provided
4 hours ago · Like · 2
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James Birmingham An example of a place with worse poverty than post WW1 Germany?

    • Current day Greece. Spain. A large portion of Sub-Saharan Africa.
4 hours ago · Like · 1
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James Birmingham So Germans were just more desperate than starving Asian peasants? And thus became Nazis? The whole believing in Whiteness thing didn't have anything to do with Nazism? Wut?
4 hours ago · Like
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David Allen I said it was a symptom, and perhaps a lubricant. But the engine was actually economical.
4 hours ago · Like
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David Allen So, as a symptom, it has SOMETHING to do with it. But is not the cause.
4 hours ago · Like
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David Allen These are complex systems we're talking about. So claiming that any one part was responsible for the whole thing is going to be at least partially wrong.
4 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham Pointing out that belief-systems are influenced by economics doesn't make cultural influences not matter.

    • Also remember I only brought it up because you said you could never see yourself complaining about 'a system'
4 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham it is also a really silly thing to point out to someone who has taught Marx.
4 hours ago · Like · 1
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Allyn Lindsey Daniel, I didn't like being in a position of power much either, but faced with a gesture or not having gas or food, I chose the gesture. I tried to treat that position as a gesture as well. I had a key. I wasn't necessarily the guy in charge.
4 hours ago via mobile · Like
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Dan Lyles I mean, I totally feel that feel, Allyn. We sometimes get trapped in these tight spots where there isn't much good we can do, so we do what we can. I am just always worried that we come to be too content with those gestures and that we give ourselves too much credit for them. We gotta use the gestures we've gotten to do something more than just kick a little extra pocket change down the line.
4 hours ago · Like · 1
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David Allen Honestly, in a world filled with other living beings, I'm pretty sure we'll always be making compromises on what we want in order to survive. You can adopt capitalism, anarchy, socialism, fascism, or whatever other ism you'd like, and there will still always be problems, and people will always struggle against them. So I chose not to complain about it and instead spend my time working on ways to change it. You can call that fascist or whatever you'd like. It doesn't change who I am.
3 hours ago · Like
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Allyn Lindsey All I tried to do with mine was make my co-workers' and my employees' time at their terrible job more enjoyable. They can determine the amount of credit I get from that, not me.
3 hours ago via mobile · Like
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James Birmingham What are you doing to change it exactly?

    • And how does one work to change system without critiquing them?

    • I didn't call you a fascist - I called you apathetic.
3 hours ago · Like
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David Allen I'm working within the games industry to fight against gender constructions like "damsel in distress" tropes, and creating games that are about empathy, courage, and love instead of violent power fantasies and first-person shooters. If you have any other suggestions, I'm all ears.
3 hours ago · Like
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Dan Lyles And they do. I just know that when I stopped to think about it, I was always hungry to make a more meaningful impact than we would every be able to as their bosses. I didn't just want them to have better bosses- I didn't want them to have any. Which, as David is quick to point out, is difficult or complicated (actually, he'd probably go for something a little stronger that sounds more authoritative), but that's cool. We go into the the world, we work in the projects we work on, we struggle, and we occasionally try to raise the consciousness of people (and ourselves) through our pithy Facebook posts. I think that counts for something. I mean, it's also like the little gestures we just talked about- a little something, but not enough- and I think we would agree that it means something to the people who receive those gestures well.
3 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham i mean that sounds nice - i question 'the game industry' angle, but for a liberal i guess youre doing better than a lot of others
3 hours ago · Unlike · 2
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David Allen
3 hours ago · Like
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David Allen Dan, I agree, and I am very happy that you are trying to make the world a better place. The only reason why I called your words into question is that I feel messages like your original post further marginalize you as an ideologue from your intended audience. Your friends and family love what you're saying, but the way you're saying it requires a choir that already somewhat agrees with you. If you really want to communicate with the "filthy capitalist bosses", actually bridge a connection and speed up the day where we have another system, coming up with more tactful and research-based statements will go a long way.
3 hours ago · Like
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David Allen Not that this is the best example, but here are some people in environmentalism who are taking an approach which I would like to think can be effective in helping them bridge the gap between "environmentalists" and the rest of the world more effectively -- http://grist.org/article/doe-reprint/external image safe_image.php?d=AQBIXKMnUm83zM-x&w=154&h=154&url=http%3A%2F%2Fgrist.files.wordpress.com%2F2005%2F01%2Fdoe_report_cover1.gif
The death of environmentalism: Global warming politics in a post-environmental worldgrist.orgThis essay by Michael Shellenberger and Ted Nordhaus was released at an October ...

3 hours ago · Like · Remove Preview
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James Birmingham I think you're assuming too much about Dan's audience but I won't speak for Dan.

    • I can speak for myself and say my anarchism isn't contingent on converting 'the masses' - I have 0 interest in talking to bosses.
3 hours ago · Edited · Like
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David Allen Is that an accidental commit? What are you claiming to have won?
3 hours ago · Like
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David Allen Or were you in the middle of typing "won't" ?
3 hours ago · Like
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Dan Lyles Ugh. Nothing is slimier to me than to be instructed on how to perform proper speech. And then to follow it up with insistence that since what I have to say alienates you, I'm 'missing my intended audience'. Also, we're not so much a 'choir' as a moshpit.
3 hours ago · Like · 3
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James Birmingham Which is why I just gave a talk at the Boston Anarchist Bookfair and not a fucking TED Talk.
3 hours ago · Like · 3
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David Allen Do you guys honestly believe that all corporations are evil?
3 hours ago · Like
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David Allen And that all bosses are douchebags?
3 hours ago · Edited · Like
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Britney Sg This is funny to me because James Birmingham and Dan Lyles are two of the most community- and activist-minded people I've ever known, and the "stop complaining and build something" criticism makes no sense here...
3 hours ago via mobile · Like · 3
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James Birmingham All capitalist corps and the bosses within them? yeah I do. Nature of the beast.
3 hours ago · Like · 1
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David Allen I'm not so much saying "stop complaining and build something". The building something is obviously happening. I'm more saying "stop complaining. Use a more effective and convincing rhetoric for your ideas".
3 hours ago · Like
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Dan Lyles Short answer: Yes.
    • Longer Answer(pick one):
    • (1) "People do not choose evil out of a desire for evil. They choose evil mistaking it for happiness- the good they seek." - Mary Shelly
    • (2) The banality of evil would likely blow your mind.
    • (3) The structure of the thing has agency, but not the same kind of intentionality that we might ascribe to you or myself. I intend to think of it in the kind of way we might think of the Aliens for Alien for Sharks feeding in the ocean.
3 hours ago · Like · 2
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James Birmingham Humanity will not be free until the last bureaucrat is strangled with the guts of the last capitalist.
3 hours ago · Like · 1
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David Allen To James, what about corporations like the BBC?
3 hours ago · Like
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David Allen Such violence.
3 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham Anarchist dude. Nation states.
3 hours ago · Like · 1
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James Birmingham (not a pacifist)
3 hours ago · Like · 1
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David Allen Are you forgetting that violent revolutions never work?
3 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham As clearly evidenced by Haiti
3 hours ago · Like · 1
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David Allen Haiti is still in extreme poverty.
3 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham or Spain, or Mexico,
3 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham Not because of kicking out the slavers though lol
3 hours ago · Like · 1
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Dan Lyles "Never Work" is a bit strong. Even as one who has strong feelings for non-violence, I gotta say that we've been rewarded by capitalists for trumpeting that line for the last 60 years.
3 hours ago · Like
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David Allen Spain and Mexico are still capitalists systems, las time I checked.
3 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham well spain is an example of fascism winning out over monarchism and republicanism.

    • i didnt say these revolutions were anticapitalist or anarchist just that they happened and were violent and 'worked'
3 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham see also France and the USA
3 hours ago · Like · 1
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Dan Lyles Boom.
3 hours ago · Like · 1
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David Allen Violent revolutions have always mirrored the systems they overthrown. New figureheads rise to power, but the underlying power structure usually gets perpetuated by the new rulers.
3 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham but yeah youre right violence never changed anything ::eye roll::
3 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham yes which is why we live in a monarchy, bravo dude.
3 hours ago · Edited · Like
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David Allen You consider the US revolution a triumph?
3 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham i consider it a revolution that didnt fail seeing as were arent in England right now
3 hours ago · Like · 1
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David Allen It might have taken a few centuries, but I'm pretty sure you two would agree that we're back in a state where the majority of our interests are no longer represented by the government.
3 hours ago · Like
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Dan Lyles Violent revolutions, really all revolutions, take on aspects of the society that they are trying to break form. Revolutions don't get you to the new and better world- they provide openings where you might build something slightly better and strive towards the next revolution.
3 hours ago · Like · 1
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Dan Lyles Well, I'm a black guy so the majority of my interests weren't represented in that other government anyway, so I dunno how much 'sliding' has happened exactly.
3 hours ago · Like · 2
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David Allen Agreed. But I'm pretty sure that revolutions have proven that they don't change much about the division of power. Just who gets to be in charge.
3 hours ago · Like
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Dan Lyles I mean, if you don't look too closely, sure it looks that way. But stuff is happening even if it isn't fed to you in a fine, pithy slush.
3 hours ago · Like
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David Allen Revolutions are like a wheel of fortune (Rota Fortunae, not the TV show).
3 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham That is an entirely different claim than "violent revolutions never work"

    • which seems to suggest that nonviolent revolutions of the past don't fall into this trap youre claiming
3 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham I am pretty sure power being in the hands of 1000s of aristocrats instead of one guy qualifies as a big enough change in the division of power to qualify as a revolution - not saying that arrangement is ideal but saying it as a revolution 'didn't work' is frankly ludicrous.
3 hours ago · Like · 1
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David Allen They certainly do "something", but not what they claim to do. Revolutions are usually suported by lower-upper class people (or upper-middle class people) who want to overthrow upper-upper class people, using the middle class and lower classes as cannon fodder. Then, when they get into power, they pretty much perpetuate the cycle.
3 hours ago · Like
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David Allen And as for the US revolution, when I compare USA with Canada (still under the crown), I'm pretty sure there's a clear winner here.
3 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham canada may be one of the few nations even more racist than here ftr
3 hours ago · Edited · Like · 1
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James Birmingham Also Canada is its own nation-state not a suzerain
3 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham Look you can be a pacifist, that's nice, whatevs, but I'm not gonna let silly shit like 'violent revolutions never work' fly
3 hours ago · Like · 1
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Dan Lyles For real. James. I'm down with the way of peace and shit, but even I gotta call bullshit on that over simplification.
3 hours ago · Like · 1
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David Allen I'll make one larger claim then. Violent revolutions don't actually do what they're started for, AND a good number of poor, middle class people die as a result of them.
3 hours ago · Like · 1
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James Birmingham there has only ever been one anarchist revolution and soviets and fascists killed it - so the one example i have of a revolution that was anarchist (ie not seeking to take state power) didnt work. but it did work for a little while and it used violence.
3 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham (arguably two if you count Makhno)
3 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham so Haitians didn't end slavery in Haiti?
3 hours ago · Like
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David Allen Haiti might have its freedom internally, but they're still slaves in the global economy.
3 hours ago · Like
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David Allen Have you ever been to Haiti?
3 hours ago · Like
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Dan Lyles I gotta tell you, being a slave on the global economy is way better than having someone own you with whips and shit.
3 hours ago · Edited · Like · 2
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James Birmingham That isn't the result of the revolution in Haiti though. are you suggesting it'd be better off without the revolution?
3 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham No I'm not big on poverty-tourism.
3 hours ago · Like · 2
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David Allen I have been a volunteer with both Partners in Health and the Haiti Cardiac Association, and I have to tell you that extreme poverty is still a problem there regardless of revolution or not.
3 hours ago · Like
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David Allen The one thing that has changed since the revolution is that now the Hatian government bears the full weight of the responsibility for making the situation better. This IS a good thing, but they're still in an extremely difficult situation, one which will likely not be solved by them becoming anarchists.
3 hours ago · Like
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Dan Lyles Give me a second, David. I'm having a hard time typing a response if I have to keep laughing every other post.
3 hours ago · Like · 2
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David Allen Have you ever talked to a Hatian?
3 hours ago · Like
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David Allen I'm trying to figure out where it is that you guys get off making comments about countries that you only know about through books.
3 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham Yes I've talked to haitians. I grew up in south florida.
3 hours ago · Like
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David Allen Excellent.
3 hours ago · Like
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David Allen Finally a connection.
3 hours ago · Like
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David Allen First one of the night.
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James Birmingham You can't blame the revolution for the IMF
3 hours ago · Like · 1
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Dan Lyles I'm trying to figure out where you get off making comments about countries that you have only know about through the intervention of liberal states. See, I can can do that slippery "I have authority and you don't" move too. I just don't 'cause it ignores the point that you don't have some special monopoly on the 'true' knowledge of Haiti anymore than anyone else here.
3 hours ago · Like · 3
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James Birmingham http://www.counterpunch.org/.../external image safe_image.php?d=AQD90DbWHwinUIng&w=154&h=154&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.counterpunch.org%2Fwp-content%2Fdropzone%2F2013%2F09%2Fthe_american_way_of_poverty_book_cover.jpg
Why the U.S. Owes Haiti Billions » CounterPunch: Tells the Facts, Names the Nameswww.counterpunch.orgWhy the U.S. Owes Haiti Billions

3 hours ago · Like
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David Allen Ok, so that article states that the US, the revolution that "worked", might have a huge part to play in Haiti's suffering?
3 hours ago · Like
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Dan Lyles Right? It's almost as though the social world is totally complicated and not simply intuitive.
3 hours ago · Like
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David Allen Yes.
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James Birmingham are you still making this liberal revolutions arent revolutions claim?
3 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham look i am 100% against states, but when one territory becomes a new one that is called a revolution - dont blame me blame the dictionary
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David Allen That's why I keep on saying that revolutions don't work. Some do, on a small level, but overall, they are not the panacea of human suffering.
3 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham a revolution is an event not a strategy
3 hours ago · Like · 1
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James Birmingham theyre all different
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David Allen There are many ways to get freedom, revolution is only one of them, usually the most violent.
3 hours ago · Like
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David Allen ...and not the most effective.
3 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham oh yeah, what other ways has 'freedom' come about where it didnt exist before?
2 hours ago · Like · 1
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David Allen India.
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David Allen The collapse of the USSR.
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David Allen The US civil war.
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James Birmingham You mean things like the Velvet Revolution?
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David Allen (Not a revolution).
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James Birmingham (pretty violent though)
2 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham I'll tag in Will Brown or Kotumal X Bajaj for chatting about India because they know it much better than me.
2 hours ago · Like
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David Allen The whole civil rights movement.
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David Allen Women's suffrage.
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David Allen Would you like me to continue?
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James Birmingham Because that's gone really well.
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David Allen It's a work in progress.
2 hours ago · Like
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David Allen And last time I checked, we have a non-whitey in the oval office.
2 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham Look, reform exists - no argument there - but those examples (save India and the USSR and the civil war) are very different things than revolutions.
2 hours ago · Like
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Dan Lyles Here's the thing about the civil rights movement-
2 hours ago · Like
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David Allen Yes. They're evolutions.
2 hours ago · Like
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David Allen And I consider them MUCH more effective than Revolutions.
2 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham it is intellectually disingenuous to cite all these examples of reform in the US while simultaneously shooting down whenever something I mention involves the US which you called a 'failed revolution.'
2 hours ago · Like · 1
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Dan Lyles It didn't succeed merely because it was non-violent. It succeeded because it was also occurring during VIOLENT civil unrest that Dr. King knew about and was totally not about calling assholes. He basically said that he didn't know if he could tell people who had faced oppression in those ways the best way to free themselves (towards the end of his life) and advocated the strategies that worked in the context he was from. The sorta of hard line 'non-violence is the answer in its essence' line is something that white liberals loved to worship decades later because it took the teeth out of other aggressive demands for equity and justice.
2 hours ago · Edited · Like · 1
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James Birmingham i hate when people talk about the civil rights movement as nonviolent, as if victims of white supremacist violence or those who fought back against it - werent pivotal
2 hours ago · Like · 4
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Dan Lyles It's bullshit, revisionist history is what it is.
2 hours ago · Like · 3
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David Allen I agree that it was incredibly violent. But it was not a violent overthrow.
2 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham effective at what? when did we decide that the event of a revolution was about some notion of freedom you have rather than what the goals of the people fighting that revolution were? i mean fuck the Bolsheviks but they certainly got what they wanted (the inherent failures of leninism aside)
2 hours ago · Like · 1
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James Birmingham You just keep changing your statements to not appear wrong. You're just really attached to being right huh?
2 hours ago · Like
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David Allen Would you say that the civil rights movement was an example of revolution?
2 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham No?
2 hours ago · Like
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David Allen A violent overthrow of the goverment?
2 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham Do I think the civil rights movement created a new polity? is that your question? do you think i live on an alternate timeline or something?
2 hours ago · Edited · Like
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David Allen Yes.
2 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham my question is what makes these examples 'more effective' and if so effective at what?
2 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham "And I consider them MUCH more effective than Revolutions." what does that /mean/?
2 hours ago · Like
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Mike Bouchey Ok, I am breaking my own rule of not getting involved in internet debates because I think adding new voices would be beneficial here. What I have noticed is that Dan and James, and David have been talking past each other in one major respect. David seems to be interested in individuals while Dan and James seem to be interested in institutions.

    • David's focus on what his own motivations are, attempting to clarify Dan's and James's, bosses, etc. indicate this individual centric approach. Dan's and James's focus on capitalism, culture, labor, and structures indicates their institutional centric approach.

    • I am in favor of the institutional approach for a variety of reasons but first and foremost is this: institutions delineate the boundaries within which individuals may act. Its agency limits individual agency. Lets look at capitalism and bosses. Workplaces in a capitalist economy are doing one thing: generating surplus which is to be reinvested to generate more surplus which we call "profits" colloquially. This surplus is extracted by adding labor power to natural resources (which creates products which can have further labor power added to them to create "value added" products, and so on). But if workers are compensated for their labor at a rate equal to the value of their labor then all of that surplus is lost to wages. So capitalists must pay wages less than the value of the labor of the workers in order to gain surplus. The important part here is this: if no surplus is extracted then the workplace goes out of business; therefore all successful businesses in a capitalist system must extract surplus from labor; if surplus must be extracted from labor for less than the labor is worth then surplus must be gained through exploitation of labor; therefore, since all companies must gain surplus to remain in existence, all companies must exploit labor to remain in existence. If all companies must exploit labor to remain in existence then it doesn't matter how nice your boss is: if they don't exploit you their company or the company they work for will fail!

    • In short, the institution of capitalism denies any boss the ability to simultaneously not exploit their labor force and succeed in business. But really this is basic Marx, who (although he has his problems) you really shouldn't engage in such conversations without reading thoroughly.

    • Finally, this system is unavoidable by individuals as globalization has spread the influence of capitalism to all parts of the globe. Engagement with capitalism is essentially unavoidable, but it should be noted that not all engagement with capitalism is productive to capitalism. In fact, without constant state intervention, most engagement with capitalism would be (self) destructive.
2 hours ago · Like · 5
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James Birmingham
James Birmingham's photo.
James Birmingham's photo.


2 hours ago · Like · 2
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David Allen Well, in the case of the Civil Rights Movement, it's hard to argue that there isn't still a good amount of financial oppression, segregation, and racism. But the movement resulted in every American man, regardless of race, having the right to vote.
2 hours ago · Like
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Mike Bouchey You all literally posted 50 times in the time it took me to write my one post.
2 hours ago · Like · 2
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David Allen I would actually pick A.
2 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham #expertise
2 hours ago · Like · 2
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Kate Tyrol Good thing yours is 50 times as good, Mike.
2 hours ago · Unlike · 2
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David Allen
2 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham C-M-C'
2 hours ago · Like · 1
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David Allen I'm white (or at least 1/2 white, 1/2 hispanic), so quoting Dr. King's I Have a Dream Speech is likely to make Dan shit himself. I have to say, however, that I base my philosophy in struggle and change on one of his statements in that speech: "We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline. We must not allow our creative protests to degenerate into physical violence. Again and again we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force. The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to distrust all white people, for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny."

    • I know most corporations suck, capitalism is a mess, and it's very difficult on many levels to make changes to the massive system as an individual. I just don't believe physical violence and revolution is a solution I would take part in, and I chose to inspire, engage, and motivate people. Not tear them down.
2 hours ago · Edited · Like
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Dan Lyles God. You must have been waiting all night to trot out some out of context MLK Jr, haven't you? Like, you must have no reference point at all to the new militancy in the black community that he's referring at all. I'm probably Huey Newton for all you know.
2 hours ago · Like · 4
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David Allen Yes.
2 hours ago · Like
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David Allen You nailed the meaning I was trying to convey
2 hours ago · Like
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Dan Lyles Yo, he was talking about new black separatism, you ding dong, not critiques of capitalism. THE DUDE WAS A SOCIALIST WHO HATED CAPITALISM AND CORPRATISM. You would've been laughed outta the room for trying to use that to suggest that people didn't have the right to determine the best tools at hand to address their problems.
2 hours ago · Like · 4
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James Birmingham I have to write a paper now so I'll leave you with this:http://www.comedycentral.com/...external image safe_image.php?d=AQBwOIRLBqz31AP8&url=http%3A%2F%2F1.images.comedycentral.com%2Fimages%2Fshow_banners%2Fbranding_comedycentralpresents.jpg%3Fwidth%3D960%26height%3D125&jq=100
List of People Who Will Die in the RevolutionAcoustic guitar is not the sound of the revolution.

2 hours ago · Like · 2
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Db Banks The way history records revolutions makes conversations like this so difficult. It's as if people sit around until they have the perfect replacement for the existing system and then go about deliberately fighting a revolution until the conditions are such that their totally thought-out plan may be implemented. That is not at all how societal change takes place.
2 hours ago via mobile · Like · 2
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Dan Lyles The "WE" he's talking about isn't the big universal "WE" that the white power structure he was combatting used. He meant the contextual we- those who saw themselves having a similar background and position to himself. People, I should point out, who wouldn't have taken it on themselves to impose their tactics on others.
2 hours ago · Like · 1
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Db Banks We could be participating in the beginnings of what history books 100 years from now call a discreet revolution and there's no way of knowing outside of hindsight.
2 hours ago via mobile · Unlike · 2
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Db Banks David before you agree with me you should know that the revolution might involve saying bad things to bosses and maybe even violence.
2 hours ago via mobile · Like · 2
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David Allen Most likely.
2 hours ago · Like
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David Allen But I won't be doing the killing.
2 hours ago · Edited · Like
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David Allen I'd gladly die for my beliefs, but will never kill for them.
2 hours ago · Like
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Db Banks Just like participating in the violence of capitalism!
2 hours ago via mobile · Like · 1
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Dan Lyles Yeah, but I bet you'd narc out people who didn't share your ideals to the authorities who would. I mean, you don't pull the trigger but that probably doesn't bother you too much.
2 hours ago · Like · 2
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David Allen Unbelievable.
2 hours ago · Like
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David Allen You guys are filled with so much hatred.
2 hours ago · Like
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David Allen Just because I don't agree with your ideals does not make me a bad person.
2 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham I don't eat cheese for my beliefs and that is a like a little death every day - so I feel like I've paid my dues.
2 hours ago · Like · 3
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Mike Bouchey No it doesn't, but as per my earlier comment, being a good person is entirely irrelevant.
2 hours ago · Like
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Dan Lyles If they write on my tombstone "Dan Lyles- He Hated Injustice with everything in his being" I would be fine with that.
2 hours ago · Like · 4
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Db Banks I have a deep and abiding love for humans. That's why I hate capitalism. I don't know (or at least understand) what you're doing.
2 hours ago via mobile · Like · 2
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David Allen So, the way you have treated me is out of your love for me?
2 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham i hate pretty much everyone
2 hours ago · Like · 3
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David Allen That explains it
2 hours ago · Like
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David Allen Thank you for putting it in writing!
2 hours ago · Like
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Dan Lyles He called you on some bullshit you were putting out there. What greater love is there than that?
2 hours ago · Like · 3
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David Allen No matter how much you throw around words like ding-dong, fascist, cheeze-idea-eater, I am proud of who I am and I won't go labeling you for your ideals.
2 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham no one called you a fascist
2 hours ago · Like
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David Allen And that's out of respect for both you and free speech.
2 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham fuck free speech
2 hours ago · Unlike · 4
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Db Banks I can love you and still hate what you say and think.
2 hours ago via mobile · Like · 2
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Db Banks Free speech is a load of horse shit.
2 hours ago via mobile · Like · 3
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David Allen Well, thank you for saying that. It actually makes me feel much better about this whole conversation.
2 hours ago · Like
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Db Banks I'll give us both the benefit of the doubt that maybe we're not talking about the same thing. Define what you mean by free speech please.
2 hours ago via mobile · Like
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Dan Lyles Well. I'm glad your feelings are still at the center of this conversation and not like… issues or justice or whatever.
2 hours ago · Like · 5
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David Allen I'm coming out of this with a better understanding of you guys.
2 hours ago · Like
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David Allen ... and your feelings about me and my thoughts.
2 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham fuck tolerance

    • fuck assimilation

    • anarchism or gtfo

    • (non anarchists i consider friends i also consider works in progress - dan the big circle a in your heart is coming for you, you too mike <3)
2 hours ago · Like · 3
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David Allen You hate everything, and I'm ok with that.
2 hours ago · Like
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David Allen Hate on, haters.
2 hours ago · Like
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Db Banks Thanks for the permission dude.
2 hours ago via mobile · Like · 1
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James Birmingham i run on pride and hate and daiya cheese
2 hours ago · Like · 1
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David Allen Wasn't permission, that was a commandment
2 hours ago · Like
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Britney Sg I'll be impressed when your overwhelming love for everyone fills bellies rather than just making you a smug narcissist.
2 hours ago via mobile · Like · 4
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David Allen Who's telling who what to do now, eh?
2 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham i dont hide this shit have you seen my cover photo? lulz
2 hours ago · Like · 2
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Kate Tyrol James, you're like a poet.
2 hours ago · Like · 1
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David Allen Yet angrier.
2 hours ago · Like
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James Birmingham guilt is a weight; anger is a gift
2 hours ago · Like · 2
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David Allen I have neither.
2 hours ago · Like
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Britney Sg Have you met many poets? Do you think poets are happy people? Have you heard of Sylvia Plath?
2 hours ago via mobile · Like · 2
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Db Banks My cover photo is a shirtless Jeff Goldblum which should really tell you everything you need to know about my politics and personal beliefs.
2 hours ago via mobile · Like · 3
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Db Banks If you're not angry, you're not paying attention.
2 hours ago via mobile · Like
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David Allen I consider myself one.
2 hours ago · Like
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David Allen I'm passionate. It's different than anger. And much more effective.
2 hours ago · Like
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David Allen It allows me to both pursue ideals AND be happy at the same time.
2 hours ago · Like
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David Allen I highly recommend it.
about an hour ago · Like
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Dan Lyles It's like you sapped my energy with your unwillingness to be self-critical. It's weird.
about an hour ago · Unlike · 6
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James Birmingham It is like every time I have to teach Intro to STS
about an hour ago · Like · 4
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David Allen What were you hoping I would do?
about an hour ago · Like
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Db Banks My bowels are loose with desperation and disappointment.
about an hour ago via mobile · Like
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James Birmingham My bowels are loose with the vegan tamale I had for dinner.
about an hour ago · Unlike · 2
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Dan Lyles I dunno. Maybe like… think and interrogate your own presumptions and thinking, and then report back how this engagement with other minds has made you question how you think of your own.
about an hour ago · Edited · Like · 3
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Db Banks That's so hot.
about an hour ago via mobile · Like · 3
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David Allen I think I've finally found some common ground with James.
about an hour ago · Like
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Dan Lyles With loose vegan stool? Ugh. Don't get him started.
about an hour ago · Like · 2
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David Allen Funny, Dan. I was hoping for the same thing from you.
about an hour ago · Like
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David Allen I guess that makes two of us being disappointed.
about an hour ago · Like
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Db Banks What was in the tamale?
about an hour ago via mobile · Like
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James Birmingham Corn.
about an hour ago · Like
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Db Banks Just corn?
about an hour ago via mobile · Like · 1
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David Allen Nice. My second favorite veggie for stool talk has to be beets.
about an hour ago · Like
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James Birmingham and corn flour (masa) and spices.
about an hour ago · Like
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James Birmingham veggie stock probs
about an hour ago · Like
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James Birmingham I dunno vegan options at nonvegan places are always suspect
about an hour ago · Like
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Db Banks Sometimes I eat an entire pound of carrots in one sitting and terrible things happen.
about an hour ago via mobile · Unlike · 2
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Dan Lyles Is that why the seat of your chair was all fucked up? You told me you bought it that way.
about an hour ago · Unlike · 4
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Db Banks I can't hide my shame forever can I?
about an hour ago via mobile · Like · 1
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David Allen Thanks, Dan. That made my day.
about an hour ago · Like
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James Birmingham GOD ALL YOU GUYS DOO IS TALK SHIT
about an hour ago · Unlike · 3
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David Allen Well, it has been a pleasure, guys. I'm off to do my reading for a paper on art and social movements. Un abrazo.
about an hour ago · Like
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Dan Lyles WHY DON'T YOU DO SOMETHING IN THE WORLD INSTEAD OF JUST TALKING ABOUT IT? HAVE YOU EVEN BEEN TO AN ART AND SOCIAL MOVEMENT?
about an hour ago · Unlike · 5
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David Allen I've already started one.
about an hour ago · Like
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Dan Lyles Is it a MRA Art Movement?
about an hour ago · Like · 2
    • David Allen
      David Allen


+++++++++++++++++++
++ 10, November 10th ++
+++++++++++++++++++
Another Round, Bartender!
++
++ In-class discussion notes
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Something spectacular happened in class today. I felt completely ostracized and humiliated by a group of students in the class when I tried to question some of their statements during a discussion of feminism. As such, I wanted to briefly document what I experienced because it was very striking the way in which a few questions I had were taken out of context and completely ignited a group of students in a class that I feel is by far one of my favorite courses on campus.

The heat started with a discussion of the body and how it is a somewhat uncomfortable subject to talk about. During that discussion I postulated that perhaps this is because we are not used to talking about our bodies in public—that it might have something to with the fact that we (as a society), made the decision to clothe ourselves. I also voiced a question about whether or not the discussion about specific bodies (male body vs. female body) that has been pervasive in many scientific studies has continuously called out the differences between the sexes in a way that could be seen as difficult to integrate with the generalized idea of sexual equality. (At least two of Rudolph Arnheim's books—1) Visual Thinking, and 2) Art and Visual Perception: A Psychology of the Creative Eye—include information about the science of visual perception. I personally know that this type of "research" has been read by designers I met while at Conde Nast [New Yorker, Vogue, Brides, Bon Apetit, W, Parade, etc.] and is used as a text in graphic design courses and advertising on a regular basis.)

I was invigorated at this point, and very engaged in this discussion. Then something shifted.


Michael Bouchey asked whether or not anyone has studied patriarchy as a pathology. This struck me as a politically charged question, and wanted to explore this idea. I asked something to the effect of "if you're suggesting that patriarchy might be a pathology, what would you say of matriarchy?" The response was a dismissive "something that has never existed", and things started escalating a bit as I continued to question that claim based on contradictions in my personal experience in many ways, as well as how there are some allergic reactions to adverse points of view within the feminist community which might be undermining its progress into a widely practiced ideology.

The discussion moved on to data and science at some point, I brought up Hanz Rosling, and Michael Fortun started talking about the scientific discourse of big data and how more and more, researchers a claiming correlation between the expression of certain genes and asthma, or the sizes of the hippocampus and homosexuality.

A-la-Mike Birbiglia, "What I should have said... was nothing."

Instead, my pea-brained mind (as I'm sure Ben Brucato would classify it) wondered what would happen if the scientific community were to "discover" that something like "patriarchy", if diagnosed as a pathology as per Michael Bouchey's question, was genetic and I asked that out loud to the group. My question was followed by a complete uproar—at least half of the students in the class laughed in disbelief that someone could even come up with such a thought. Karin Patzke claimed that, and I'm paraphrasing on my brief memory of the event, "If that happened, I think everyone should commit suicide". Another uproar. James Birmingham stood up and high-fived her. I was horrified. How does a scientific discovery lead to mass suicide? Was that a Jonestown reference I was missing?

external image 4058008_700b.jpg

Again, "What I should have said... was nothing."

Instead I called out Karin's response to my question as precisely the kind of knee-jerk allergic reaction I had talked about after Michael Bouchey had made a similar dismissal and mockery of my controversial point of view. Karin took it as my calling her "Histerical" and said something to that effect and Michael Bouchey stood up and high-fived her even though I had said nothing of the sort.

At some point, Ben Brucato labeled my question the stupidest thing he has ever heard in academic discourse, packed up his stuff and left the room. At first, it seemed like an act of extreme condescension and cowardice, an intellectual shanking, if you will. But to his defense, he did eventually return at some later point with a bagel to sit next to me, but his behavior was still dismissive and definitely hostile.

Anyone who has read this far—I hope at least Bouchey, Karin, and Brocato—might be wondering why I am writing this:
  1. Because this was an intense experience and the only experience where I have been in an academic setting and been so intensely attacked for my points of view.
  2. I am still in disbelief that people who are (assumigly) arguing in the name of justice and of defending non-dominant discourse could resort to the psychological bullying of someone presenting ideas that went against the grain of the dominant discourse on the subject of feminism.
  3. I would like Bouchey, Karin, and Brocato to cite their sources so that I too can drink from the fountains of knowledge, and perhaps consider myself as intellectually superior and above questioning as they consider themselves to be.
  4. I would like to openly thank Heather Dewey Hagborg, Michael Fortun, and Michael Lachney for actually engaging in the questions I was raising, and making attempts to diffuse the situation despite my efforts to further agitate them.

++
++ Plant, Sadie. 1996. "The Future Looms : Weaving Women and Cybernetics." In Clicking in : hot links to a digital culture, edited by Lynn Hershman-Leeson, x, 371 p. Seattle: Bay Press.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
p.125—Queen of Engines—'Cyberpunk is only one confusion: Ada's letters—and indeed her scientific papers– are scattered with suspicions of her own strange relation to humanity.'

p.126—'Scorning public opinion, she nevertheless gambled, took drugs, and flirted to excess. But what she did best was computer programming—the mathematics of the unfamiliar.'

p.128—Bits of Fluff—Quoting Freud' "It seems," he writes, "that women have made few contributions to the discoveries and inventions in the history of civilization; there is, however, one technique which they have invented—that of plaiting and weaving." Not content with this observation, Freud is of course characteristically "tempted to guess the unconscious motive for the achievement. Nature herself," he suggests, "would seem to have given the model which this achievement imitates by causeing the grown at maturity of the pubic hair that conceals the genitals. The step that remained to be taken lay in making the threads adhere to one another, while on the body they stick into the skin and are only matted together. '

p.130—'In 1944, Howard Aiken developed Mark 1, what he thought was the ifrst programmable computer, although he had really been beaten by a German civil engineer, Konrad Zuse, who had in fact built such a machine, the Z-3, in 1941.'

'Mark 1, or the IBM Automtic Sequence Controlled Calculator, was bsed on Babage's designs and itself programmed by another woman, Captain Grace Murray Hopper, often described as the "Ada Lovelace" of Mark 1 and its successors. She wrote the first high-level lanuage compiler, was instrumental in the development o the computer language COBOL and even introduced the term "bug" to describe soft- or hardware glitches after she found a dead moth interrupting the smooth circuits of Mark 1. Woman as the programmer again.'

p.131—Runaway Circuits—'This is the strange world to which Ada's programming has led: self-organizing systems, slef-arousing machines; systems of control and synthetic intelligence exceeding the commands of some central authority; an unfamiliar agency which has no need of a central will and has already bypassed a subject position.'

Past Caring—'Not that she [the womb] is left behind; carefully concealed, she nevertheless continues to function as the ground and possibility of his [human hisotory's] quests for identity, agency, and self-control. She wears "different veils according to the history period." Woman has been the natural resource for man's own cultural development. She has provided a mirror for man, his servants and accommodation, his tools and his means of communication, his spectacles and commodities, the possibility of the reproduction of his species and his world.... Still confident of his own indisputable mastery, man continues to excite and turn these systems on. In so doing he merely encurages his own destruction. Every software development is migration of control away from man, in whom it has been excercised only as domination, and ino the matrix, or syberspace, "the broad electronic net in which virtual realities are spun." '

p.132—'At the peak of his triumph, the culmination of his machinic erections, man confronts his systems of social security and finds them female and dangerous.¶ This will indeed seem a strange twist to history to those who believe that it runs in straight lines. But as Irigaray asks: "If machines, even machines of theory, can be aroused all by themselves, may woman not do likewise?" '

p.134—' "They go beyond all simulation," writes Irigaray of women. Perhaps it iwas alwasy the crack, the slit, which marked them out, but what they have missed is not the identity of the masculine but their own connection to the virtual, the repressed dynamic of matter. Misogyny and technophobia are equally displays of man's fear of the matrix, the virtual machinery which subtends his world and lies on the other side of every patriarchal culture's veils. At the end of the twentieth entruy, women are no longer the only rminder of this other side. Nor are they containable as child-bearers, fit for only one thing. No longer the adding machines, they are past caring; with the computer, as abstract machine, there is nothing they cannot do.'

'The computer was always a simulation of weaving; threads of ones and zeros riding the carpets and simulating silk screens in the perpetual motions of cyberspace.'

p.135—'...Ada herself... lives on, in her own name, her footnotes secreted in the software of the military machine.'

Is there something in here I can use in my work? The idea of the simulations as female, responding to, reflecting back, and augmenting the user in a way that women "go beyond all simulation"?

++
++ Wilson, Elizabeth. Neural Geographies: Feminism and the Microstructure of Cognition. (Chapter 1)
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

++
++ Wilson, Elizabeth. "Gut feminism." differences (X:Y):n-n+p
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++
++ Grosz, Elizabeth, 2011. "Feminism, Materialism, and Freedom," "The Future of Feminist Theory; Dreams for New Knowledges," and "Differences Disturbing Identity: Deleuze and Feminism, Chapters 4-6 of Becoming Undone: Darwinian Reflections on Life, Politics, and Art
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


+++++++++++++++++
++ 9, October 31st ++
+++++++++++++++++
Feminist Cocktail
++
++ Butler, Judith. Excitable Speech (selection)
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
p.72—'Whereas earlier moments in the civil rights movement or in feminist activism were primarily concerned with documenting and seeking redress for various forms of discrimnation, the current political concern with hate speech emphasizes the linguistic form that discrimnatory conduct assumes, seeking to establish verbal conduct as discriminatory action."

p.80–1—'To the extent that the speaker of hate speech is understood to affect the subordinating message that he or she relays, that speaker is figured as wielding the sovereign power to do what he or she says, one for whom speaking is immediately acting. Examples of such illocutionary performatives in J. L. Austin's How to Do Things With Words are very offent culled from legal instances: "I sentence you," I pronounce you": these are words of the state that perform the very action that they enunciate. As a sign of a certain displacemnt from the law, this very performative power is attributed now to the one who utters hate speech—thus constituting his or her agency, efficaciousness, and likelyhood of being prosecuted. The one who speaks hate speech exercises a performative in which subordination is effected, however "masquerading" that performative may be. As a performative, hate speech also deprives the one addressed of precisely this performative power, a performative power that some see as a linguistic condition of citizenship. The ability ot use words efficaciously in this way is considered to be the necessary condition ofr the normative operation of the speaker and the political actor in the public domain.'

p.82—'The class of people, mainly women, who are subordinated and dgraded through their depiction in pornography, the class to whom pornography addresses its imperative of subordination, are the ones who lose their voice, as it were, as the consequence of having been addressed and discredited by the voice of pornography. Understood as hate speech, pornography deprives the addressee (the one depicted who is at once presumed to be the one to whom pornography is addressed) of the power to speak.'

p.83—'As Hill utters the sexualized discourse, she is sexualized by it, and that very sexualization undercuts her effort to represent sexualization itself as a kind of injury. After all, in speaking it, she assumes it, furthers it, produces it; her speaking appears as an active appropriation of the sexualization she seeks to counter. Within pornography, there is no countering of this sexualization without having that very countering become a sexualized act. The pornographic is marked precisely by this power of sexual appropriation.'

'Pornography almost always works through inversions of various sorts, but hese inversions have a life an power that exceeds the domain of the pornographic.'

p.84—'...an act of speech that in its very acting produces a meaning that undercuts the one it porports to make.'

p.97—'...hate speech arguments have been invoked against minority groups, that is, in those contexts in which homosexuality is rendered graphic (Mapplethorpe) or verbally explcit (the U.S. military) and those in which African-American vernacular, especially in rap music, recirculates the terms of social injury and is thereby held responsible for such terms.'

++
++ Sedgwick, Eve Kosofksy "Paranoid Reading and Reparative Reading, or, You're So Paranoid, You Probably Think This Essay Is About You" in Touching Feeling.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
p.140—Paranoia Places its Faith in Exposure—'Human rights controversy around, for example, torture and disappearances in Argentina or the use of mass rape as part of ethnic cleansing in Bosnia marks, not an unveiling of practices that had been hidden or naturalized, but a wrestle of different frameworks of visibility. That is, violence that was from the beginning exemplary and spectacular, pointedly addressed, meant to serve as a public warning of terror to memebers of a particular community is combated by efforts to displace and redirect (as well as simply expand) its aperture and visibility.'

'...the enthusiasm for Singapore-style justice that was populrly expressed in the United States around the caning of Micahel Fay revealed a growing feeling that well-publicized shaming stugma is just what thte doctor ordered for recalcitrant youth.'

++
++ Brief and smart biographing of Evelyn Fox Keller
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
external image 318016_10150853037957197_1536489048_n.jpg
'If there is a single point on which all feminist scholarship over the past decade [the 1980s] has converged, it is the importance of recognizing the social construction of gender, and the deeply oppressive consequences of assuming that men an women are, in simone de Beauvoir's words, "born rather than made." All of my work on gender and science proceeeds from this basic recognition. My endeavor has been to call attention to the ways in which the social construction of a binary opposition between "masculine" and "femenine" has influenced the social construction of science. I argue that it is only be recognizing the social characer of the construction of both gender and science that we can realize the emancipatory value—for me, for women, and for science—of transcending that opposition. The first step, of course, is to abondon the myth that the opposition between "masculine" and "feminine" is somehow "natural," and therefore fixed. (Evelyn Fox Keller. "Evelyn Fox Keller Objects to Editory's Title." The Scientist. 7 January 1991) [[(http://www.the-]] scientist.library.upenn.edu/yr1991/jan/let2_910107.html)'

'In her essay Keller states the case this way, "The complement of the scientific mind is, of course, Nature—viewed so ubiquitously as female" (Psychonalysis and Contemporary Thought, 412). Science is considered to be entithetical to Eros, hence any woman intersted in the study of sciend is by definition "unfeminine." Thus, the heavily-stockinged, glasses-wearing, frumpy image of a woman scientist emerges, as evidenced in James Watson's description of Rosalind Franklin. Nature is objectified because the knower is divided from the known, so the very act of obtaining informaiton becomes genderized.'


+++++++++++++++++
++ 8, October 24th ++
+++++++++++++++++
This Is Not a Foucault
++
++ Spivak, Gayatri Chakravorty (1990). The Post-Colonial Critic (at least interviews 1, 3, 8, 11, 12)
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
p.vii—Editor's Note—'...the idea of a "neutral dialogue," as Gayatri Spivak points out in her interview with Rashmi Bhatnagar, Lola Chatterjee, and Rjeshwari Sunder Rajan, "denies history, denies structure, denies the positioning of subjects." One must learn to read how desire for neutrality and/or desire for the Other articulates itself. One must learn to read the text—the narrative, historical and institutional structures—in which desire is written.'

'Each interview is both a lesson to be read and a lesson in reading as we learn the slow and careful labor of unlearning our privileges as our loss.'

p.3—1, Criticism, Feminism, and the institution; with Elizabeth Grosz—'...if you think about Asia—and I notice you didn't mention that I was an Asian in your introduction; now let me say that I am one–there are intellectuals in Asia but there are no Asian intellectuals. I would stand by that rather cryptic remark. From this point of view I think the first question—the first task of intellectuals, as indeed we are—as to who asks the question about the intellectual and the specific intellectual, the universal intellectual, is to see that the specific intellectual is being defined in reaction to the universal intellectual who seems to have no particular nation-state provenance. Foucault himself, when he talks about the universal intellectual, speaks most directly about the fact that in France, in his own time, there was no distinction between the intellectual of the Left and the intellectual. Now this particular absence of a distinction would make very little sense if one went a little further afield. Having said this, let's look for a moment at Althusser.'

p.11—'There is, for example, the strategic choice of a genitalist essentialism in anti-sixist work today. How it relates to all of this other work I am talking about, I don't know, but my search is not a search for coherence, so that is how I would answer that question about the discourse of the clitoris.'

p.18, 19—2, The Post-modern Condition—'Gayatri Spivak, could I ask you first whether the deconstructionnist movement is a declaration of war, or the celebration of a victory over the grand récits?¶ SPIVAK I think of it myself as a radical acceptance of vulnerability. The grands récits are great narratives and the narrative has an end in view. It is a programme which tells how social justice is to be achieved. And I think the post-structuralists, if I understand them right, imagine again and again that when a narrative is constructed, something is left out. When an end is defined, other ends are rejected, and one might not know what those ends are. So I think what they are about is asking over and over again, What is it that is left out? Can we know what is left out? We must know the limits of the narratives, rather than establish the narratives as solutions for the future, for the arrival of social justice, so that to an extent they're working with an understand of what they cannot do, rather than declaring war.¶ HAWTHORN So if I understand it, then, they're not objecting to the very idea of producing narratives, they are, so to speak, dancing critically on the edge of every narrative that's produced, point out the silences, pointing out the unspoken, undescribed others that are implied in each of these narratives. They're not themselves concerned to put a stop to narration itself.¶ SPIVAK I think if one can lump Derrida and Lyotard together in this way, I think what they are noticing is that we cannot but narrate. So it's not a question of waging war on narratives, but they're realizing that the impulse to narrate is not necessarily a solution to problems in the world. So what they're interested in is looking at the limits of narration, looking at narrativity, making up stories that tell us, "This is history," or making up stories that tell us, "This is the programme to bring about social justice." They're looking at that in a certain way as symptomatic of the solution. We must work with them, but there are also problems. But the other problem also is that in a narrative, as you proceed along the narrative, the narrative takes on its own impetus as it were, so that one begins to see reality as non-narrated. One begins to say that it's not a narrative, it's the way things are.'

p.35—3, Strategy, Identity, Writing; with John Hutnyk, Scott McQuire, and Nikos Papastergiadis—''

p.107—8, Practical Politics of the Open End; with Sarah Harasym—'What is supremely useful is Derrida's articulation of the new politics of reading: that you do not excuse a text for its historical aberrations, you admit there is something in the text which can produce these readings. That is extremely useful. But then making the protocols of the text your own, you tease out the critical moments in the text and work at useful readings—readings that are scrupulous re-writings. I have repeated this to students and in talks many times, and I don't want it to become a formula. That's the problem, you know, these wonderful things become formulas, and then people just kind of—it's like a dance step. But nonetheless, trying to teach Marx this semester, I remember the history of Marxism, remembering the problems, not trying to excuse Marx or on the other hand, trying to simply turn my back on him, has been a very, very useful, a very productive exercise. I remind myself of this essay as I go on.'

p.138—11, Negotiating the Structures of Violence; with Richard Dienst, Rosanne Kennedy, Joel Reed, Henry Schwarz and Rashmi Bhatnagar—''

p.152—12, The New Historicism: Political Comitment and the Postmodern Critic; with Harold Veeser—''

++
++ Spivak, Gayatri Chakravorty. "More on Power/Knowledge" Outside in the Teaching Machine.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
p.26—Reading Foucault and Derrida Together—'Let us enter the task at hand by way of the "ism" of names—"nominalism"—and open up once again that famous sentence, written to be repeated: "One needs to be a nominalist, no doubt: power, it is not an institution, and it is not a structure; it is not a certain strength [puissance] that some are endowed with; it is the name that one lends [prêter] to a complex strategical situation in a particular society." This provisional "naming" by the theorist is not simply to code within a given system. "this multiplicity of force relations can be coded... either in the form of 'war' or in the form of 'politics.' " The field of possible codings can be, in principle, indefinitely enlarged. The nominalism is a methodological necessity. One needs a name for this thing whose "mechanism [can be used] as a grid of intelligibility of the social order." It is called "power" because that is the closest one can get to it. This sort of proximate naming can be called catachrestic.'

p.33—'To quote Marx where one shouldn't, Foucault always remains within the realm of necessity (even in the clinamen to his last phase) whereas Derrida makes for the realm of freedom, only to fall on his face (C3,959). I would not choose between the two.'

p.39—'And yet the slash must be honored.'


++
++ Alcoff, Linda Martin. 1999. “Becoming an Epistemologist.” In Becomings: Explorations in Time, Memory, and Futures, edited by E. Grosz, pp. 55-75. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

++
++ Foucault, Michel. The History of Sexuality Vol. 1.
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++
++ Michel Foucault, “Truth and Juridical Forms,” Power:Essential Works of Foucault, v. 3, ed. James Faubion. New York: new Press, 2000.
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++
++ Hayden White, “Introduction” and “Nietzsche,” Metahistory.
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++
++ Elisabeth Roudinesco, Philosophy in turbulent times [electronic resource] : Canguilhem, Sartre, Foucault, Althusser, Deleuze, Derrida translated by William McCuaig. Columbia University Press 2010.
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++
++ Smith, Barbara Herrnstein. 1988. “Truth/Value.” In Contingencies of Value: Alternative Perspectives for Critical Theory, pp. 85-124. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
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+++++++++++++++++
++ 7, October 17th ++
+++++++++++++++++

Politically Colonial


Two images of you flutter around in my mind's eye:
one slightly sad, deep in thought;
and another radiating joy and happiness.

I struggle to imagine what you would be like
if you were not you. Up, down, sideways, or spinning around,
you captivate me, entrance me with movement.

I get sad sometimes
when you have days like today.
And I worry a little.

Then I remember how resilient you are—how quickly
you heal, move your energy around and return.

You make things lighter when they become heavy;
easier when they're not.
I love that about your spirit. And I adore.

I enjoy seeing you be you.
What more?

—чудесник—



++
++ Achille Mbembe, On the Postcolony
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
p.1—Introduction: Time on the Move—'No, they were not inhuman. Well, you know, that was the worst of it—this suspicion of their not [?] being inhuman. It would come slowly to one. They howled and leaped, and spun, and made horrid faces; but what thrilled you was just the thought of their humanity—like yours—the thought of your remote kinship with this wild and passionate uproar.'

'...the impossibility of getting over and done "with something without running the risk of repeating it and perpetuating it under some other guise." What is going on?'

p.2—'...Africa as an idea, a concept, has historically served, and continues to serve, as a polemical argument for the West's desperate desire to assert its difference from the rest of the world. In several respects, Africa still constitutes one of the metaphors through which the West represents the origin of its own norms, develops a self-image, and integrates this image into the set of signifiers asserting what it supposes to be its identity.'

p.3—THE LONG DOGMATIC SLEEP—'...almost universally, the simplistic and narrow prejudice persists that African social formations belong to a specific category, that of simple societies or of traditional societies. That such a prejudice has been emptied of all substance by recent criticism seems to make absolutely no difference; the corpse obstinately persists in getting up again every time it is burried [«zombie?»] and, year in year out, everyday language and much ostensibly scholarly writing remain largely in thrall to this presupposition.'

'...facticity and arbitrariness...'

p.5—'Thus, on the basis of dichotomies that hardly exist, everything is considered said once it has been shown that the subjects of action, subjected to power and law—colonized people, women, peasants, workers (in short, the dominated)—have rich and complex consciousness; that they are capable of challenging their oppression; and that power, far from being total, is endlessly contested, deflated, and reappropriated by its "targets." ... all struggles have become struggles of representation. Levies, exploitation, corvée, taxes, tribute, and coercion no longer exist. Breaking away from the influence of Weber, everything has become "network," and no one asks any more about the market and capitalism as institutions both contingent and violent.'

p.103—Chapter 3. The Aesthetics of Vulgarity—'...the banality of power in the postcolony.'

p.114–5—'Forced labor (les forçats) in the postcolony, then, is of a different kind. Authorities can requisition people's bodies and make them join in the displays and ceremonies of the commandement, requiring them to sing or dance or wriggle their bodies about in the sun. We can watch these dancers, "these hung-over rounds of meat reeking of wine and tobacco, the heavy mouths, dead eyes, the smiles and the faces," carried away by the stoccato rhythm of the drums as a presidential procession goes by, on a day set aside to celebrate the Party or the "Shining Guide of the Nation."¶ These bodies could just as easily be in a state of abandon, caught, as the novelist says, "by the beer, the wine, the dancing, the tobacco, the love pumped out like spit, the strange drinks, the sects, the player—everything that might stop them being the bad conscience of their Excellencies." These same bodies can be neutered whenever they are thought to be "disfiguring" a public place or are considered a threat to public order (just as demonstration are crushed in bloodshed)—or whenever the commandement, wishing to leave imprinted on the minds of its subjects a mark of its enjoyment, sacrifices them to the firing squad.'

p.115—'A crowd is summoned because, without it, the execution lacks glamor; it is the crowd that gives the event its lavishness.'

'...power is not an empty space. It has its hierarchies and its institutions, it has its techniques. Above all, in the postcolony it is an economy of death—or, more precisely, it opens up a space for enjoyment at the very moment it makes room for death; hence the wild applause that, like the bullets, stifled the cries of the condemned.'

p.122–3—'This art of regulating society is now too well known for further comment, but consider instead, for example, visits by foreign heads of state. In october 1987, when a reception for Abdou Diouf, president of Senegal, was organized, forty-two dance troupes were brought to the airport hours before his arrival. Most of the dancers had, as usual, oblong cowbells attached to their ankles and above their knees. They were accompanied by drums, tambourines, guitars, zylophones, and flutes made from bamboo, or from gazelle or antelope horn, in different sizes. There were bullroarers and other wind instruments of various shapes and material, some made of iron, others from gourds with necks slotted together—the latter made a particularly deep, hoarse sound. There were percussion instruments, iron gongs and bells crafted of metal shells, and tubes emitting a metallic sound, to set the rhythm of the dance. Once synchronized, these instruments could bring on possession, "enchant" the dancers, or at least deafen the crowd—a necessary magnifier of power.'

'In the world of self-adoration that is the postcolony, the troupes summoned to dance bear witness to the central place accorded to the body in the processes of commandment and submission. Under colonial rule, it was the bodies of convicts and laborers that were requisitioned for public works or for porterage. In the postcolony, bodies have been used to entertain the powerful in ceremonies and official parades. On such occasions some of the bodies have bourne the marks of famine: flaky scalps, scabies, skin sores. Others have attracted small crowds of flies. But none of this has stopped them from breaking into laughter or peals of joy when the presidential limousines approached. They have stamped the ground with their feet, blanketing the air with dust. Wearing the party uniform, with the image of the head of state printed upon it, women have followed the rhythm of the music and swung their torsos forward and back; elsewhere, they have pulled in and thrust out their bellies, their undulating movement evoking as usual the slow, prolonged penetration of the penis and its stoccato retreat. Yelling and ululating, gesticulating with bodies contorted, everyone would cheer the passing cavalcade of cars, shattering what Rimbaud called "the absurd silence of the stammerer" and content to sustain a link, if only for a second, of familiarity—of collusion, even—with violence and domination in their most heady form.'

p.173—Chapter 5. Out of the World—'...the phenomenology of violence. Or, more precisely... that state of deprivation or apparent non-actuality called death.'

p.175—'To colonize is, then to , accomplish a sort of sparky clean act of coitus, with the characteristic feature of making horror and pleasure coincide.¶ The origin of this act of coitus, if we look closely, is to be found in language—or, to be precise, in the ambiguity of the relationship between colonial vocabulary and what it seeks to designate: its referent. Long before the colony was conquered and penetrated, a web of words had been woven around these distant lands and their peoples. Take, for example, the case of Hegel, dealing with Africa in his Reason in History. This text is, in fact, the archetype of what would become the colonial mode of speaking about Africa. Hegelian discourse regards Africa—what passes for Africa—as a vast tumultuous world of drives and sensations, so tumultuous and opaque as to be practically impossible to represent, but which words must nevertheless grasp and anchor in pre-set certainty.'

p.176–7—'But, in a framework in which every word spoken is spoken in a context of urgency—the urgency of ignorance—it is only possible to take the path from sense to reason in the opposite direction by saturating the words, resorting to an excess of words, provoking a suffocation of images. Whence the jerky, stuttering, abrupt, and ultimately empty character of the colonial story. In the Hegelian nightmare, for example, each African country has its own sorcerers. These, says the philosopher, indulge in special ceremonies accompanied by all kinds of movements, dances, din, and clamor, making their dispositions amid this deafening uproar. If, for example, the army is in the field and terrible thunderstorms break, the sorcerers must perform their duty by threatening and commanding the clouds to be still.¶ Similarly, in times of draught, they must make rain. "They do not invoke God in their ceremonies; they do not turn to any higher power, for they believe that they can accomplish their aims by their own efforts. To prepare themselves for their task, they work themselves into a state of frenzy; by means of singing, they reach a state of extreme delirium in which they proceed to issue their commands. If they do not succeed after prolonged efforts, they decree that some of the onlookers—who are their own dearest relations—should be slaughtered, and these are then devoured by their fellows.... The priest will often spend several days in this frenzied condition, slaughtering human beings, drinking their blood, and giving it to the onlookers to drink. In practice, therefore, only some individuals have power over nature, and these only when they are beside themselves in a state of dreadful enthusiasm."¶ This verbal economy operates according to barely concealed laws. First, one takes anecdotes, fragments of the real world, scattered and disconnected things, things one has not actually witnessed but only heard from a chain of intermediaries. Then one eliminates all references to time. All the variety of the stories is ironed out; all local reference is removed. From these remains of the actual and of the froth of rumor, one makes furtive sketches, scenes rearranged as one likes, pictures full of movement—in short, a dramatic story in which words and images, in the final analysis, amount to very little. When not commenting on buffoonery, unbridled enjoyment and the urge to destroy, they are telling of catastrophe, convulsions, disaster already happened or about to happen—of breakdown, instant terror. It matters little that the words do not relate to any precise event, provided that they preserve, for the phenomena allegedly being described, stark immediacy, and testify to the primacy of sensation and utterness of the region's disorder.'

FURTHER RESEARCH?
- 2. The People of Paris: An Essay in Popular Culture in the Eighteenth Century, by Daniel Roche
- 15. Bolshevik Festivals, 1917–1920, by James von Geldern
- 26. The Women of Paris and Their French Revolution, by Dominique Godineau
- 30. Crescendo of the Virtuoso: Spectacle, Skill, and Self-Promotion in Paris during the Age of Revolution, by Paul Metzner
- 40. Politics and Theater: The Crisis of Legitimacy in Restoration France, 1815–1830, by Sheryl Kroen
- 41. On the Postcolony, by Achille Mbembe

p.271—Index
- animal, 1, 14, 26–28, 34, 58, 174, 176, 188–90, 193–96, 204, 207, 212, 221, 235, 237–40, 243
- beast, 1, 2, 27, 167, 194, 197
- beauty, 195, 242
- body, 2, 8, 17, 27, 28, 112–15, 121–23, 132, 144, 153, 160, 175, 178, 186, 187, 193, 198, 200, 202, 204, 205, 221, 222, 224, 231, 234, 235, 237, 240
- coitus, 175, 220, 222
- dance, 114, 122–23, 128, 129–30, 139, 144, 167, 176, 182, 185
- dancers, 114, 122–23, 129–30, 185
- debt, 45, 47, 53, 67, 71, 73, 80, 131
- desire, 15, 188, 189, 190, 199, 212, 219, 224, 232, 233, 235, 238
- divine, 15, 212, 217, 220, 226–28, 231, 233
- divinity, 213, 216, 220, 223
- dreams, 12, 145, 182, 224, 238
- durée, 6, 13, 14, 16, 17, 22
- enjoyment, 2, 9, 33, 34, 43, 49, 70, 115– 16, 131–32, 148, 167, 174, 180, 188, 189, 220, 235; and happiness, 31, 212, 236, 241; hilarity, 15, 167; and humor, 108; joy, 123, 223, 233, 234; laughter, 15, 109, 111, 112, 123, 129, 143, 148, 157, 158, 164, 165, 167, 203; pleasure, 49, 110, 116, 126–27, 131–32, 148, 153, 158, 175, 181
- excess, 15, 102, 105, 117, 143, 147–49, 167, 176, 239
- fetish, 103, 104, 108, 109, 111, 121, 123, 129, 134, 136, 177
- hallucination, 118, 143, 164, 165, 167, 213, 222
- imagination, 15, 156, 159, 164, 171, 185, 188
- libido, 15, 212, 213, 227, 231
- male, 220, 236
- masculine, 212
- movements, 3, 176, 239
- orgasm, 106, 233
- sex, 226
- sexuality, 13, 31, 113, 212, 220, 221, 231
- shit, 107, 167
- technology, 52, 79, 221, 233


++++++++++++++++
++ 5, October 3rd ++
++++++++++++++++

Iterating, Reading Ethics

++
++ Derrida, Limited Inc
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p.1—SIGNATURE EVENT CONTEXT—' "Still confining ourselves for simplicity to spoken utterance." Austin, How to Do Things with Words¶ It is certain that to the word communication corresponds a concept that is unique, univocal, rigorously controllable, and transmittable: in a word, communicable? Thus, in accordance with a strange figure of discourse, one must first of all ask oneself whether or not the word or signifier "communication" communicates a determinate content, and identifiable meaning, or a describable value. However, even to articulate and to propose this question I have had to anticipate the meaning of the word communication: I have been constrained to predetermine communication as a vehicle, a means of transport or transitional medium of meaning, and moreover of a unified meaning. If communication possessed several meanings and if this plurality should prove to be irreducible, it would not be justifiable to define communication a priori as the transmission of a meaning, even supposing that we could agree on what each of these words (transmission, meaning, etc.) involved. And yet, we have no prior authorization for neglecting communication as a word, or for impoverishing its polysemic aspects; indeed this word opens up a semantic domain that precisely does not limit itself to semantics, semiotics, and even less to linguistics. For one characteristic of the semantic field of the word communication is that it designates nonsemantic movements as well. Here, even a provisional recourse to ordinary language and to the equivocations of natural language instructs us that one can, for instate, communicate a movement or that a tremor [ébranlement], a shock, a displacement of force can be communicated—that is, propagated, transmitted. We also speak of different or remote places communicating with each other by means of a passage or opening. What takes place, in this sense, what is transmitted, communicated, does not involve phenomena of meaning or signification. In such cases we are dealing neither with a semantic or conceptual content, nor with a semiotic operation, and even less with linguistic exchange.'

p.21—'...a disseminating operation removed from the present (of being) according to all its modifications; writing, if there is any, perhaps communicates, but certainly does not exist. Or barely, hereby, in the form of the most improbably signature.'

p.29–30—LIMITED INC A B C... D—'I COULD HAVE pretended to begin with a "false" beginning, my penchant for falsity [pour le faux] no longer requiring a special demonstration. I could have simulated what in French is called a "faux départ" (I ask that the translator retain the quotation marks, the parenthesis, the italics, and the French). And I shall place in the margin (I ask the publishers to follow this recommendation) the following question. I address it to Searle. But where is he? Do I know him? He may never even read this question. If he does, it will be after many others, myself included, and perhaps without understanding it. Perhaps he will understand it only in part and without judging it be quite serious. Others will probably read it after him. How is all that possible? What does it imply? That is precisely what interests me.'

'What is the nature of the debated that seems to begin here? Where, here? Here? Is it a debate? Does it take place? Has it begun already? When? Ever since Plato, whispers the prompter promptly from the wings, and the actor repeats, ever since Plato. Is it still going on? Is it finished? Does it pertain to philosophy; to serious philosophy? Does it pertain to literature? The theater? Morals? Politics? Psychoanalysis? Fiction? If it takes place, what is its place? And these utterances—are they "serious" or not? "Literal" or not? "Fictional" or not? "Citational" or not? "Used" or "mentioned"? "Standard" or not? "Void" or not? All these words are, I assure you and you can verify it yourselves, "citations" of Searle.'

'And I repeat (but why must I repeat again?) that I could have pretended to begin with a false start [faux-départ] with whatever seemed to me the "first" or "primary" utterance used of mentioned—I don't know which—in the Reply, as I read it, "originally," in manuscript.¶ On top, at the left, above the title, I then read the following: "Copyright © 1977 by John R. Searle" '

'And handwritten above the ©, the date: 1977. I received the manuscript shortly before Christmas, 1976. The use of this mention (which I rediscovered in the text published by Glyph, this time in its proper place at the bottom of the first page) would have lost all value in 1976 (no one abused it then) or in another place, or between quotation marks, as is here the case, in the middle of a page that no normal person (except, perhaps, myself) would dream of attributing to the hand of John R. Searle'

p.31—' " " "Copyright © 1977 by John R. Searle" " " '

p.39—i—'The second type I shall call mis, mistype if you like. The Reply teems with evaluative decrees involving mis. They are situated beyond, around, beneath utterances that are apparently constative, but which through their gesture of "this is so and so" tend to produce determinate effects, often quite different from those apparently intended.'

p.48—'But let's go a bit further. Does this kind of fact really exist? Where can we find it? How can we recognize it? Here we reach another type of analysis and of necessity.'

p.85—'Although it is overloaded, because or despite of its reduced dimensions, Sarl's [sic] "Derrida's Austin" races ahead. This is always a risky business on roads that aren't straight, but I won't belabor this word of warning. If the summary is "very brief," whose fault is it?'

p.94–95—'I sincerely regret that "Austin did not live long enough," and my regret is as sincere as anyone else's is, for there are surely many of us who mourn his loss. It is unfortunate, even infelicitous. But through my tears I still smile at the argument of a "development" (a word sufficiently ambiguous to mean both produce, formulate, as well as continue, so as to reach those "detailed answers") that a longer life might have led to a successful conclusion. Searle might thus be considered to have "developed" the theory: to have produced it, elaborated, and formulated it, and at the same time to have merely extended it in detail, guided it to adulthood by unfolding its potential.'


++
++ Searle, John R. "Reiterating the Differences: A Reply to Derrida"
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Parasitic this, parasitic that! Even more dramatic when read while listening to Philip Glass' Point Blank.

p.202—'Often, especially in writing, one forms one's intentions (or meanings) in the process of forming the sentences: there need not be two separate processes. This illusion is related to the second, which is that intentions must all be conscious. But in fact rather few of one's intentions are ever brought to consciousness as intentions.'

p.205—'...in a perfectly straightforward sense such utterances are "parasitical" on the standard cases... it is not metaphysical exclusion: he is not casing them into a ditch or perdition... the analysis of parasitic discourse might create some insuperable difficulties for the theory of speech acts... parasitic... parasitism?.. parasitic discourse... fiction is parasitic on nonfiction is the sense in which the definition of the rational numbers in number theory might be said to be parasitic on the definition of the natural numbers, or the notion of one logical constant in a logical system might be said to be parasitic on another, because the former is defined in terms of the latter. Such parasitism is a relation of logical dependence; it does not imply any moral judgment and certainly not that the parasite is somehow immorally sponging off the host...'

p.206—'...a man who says his lines on a stage while acting in a play while he is indeed repeating lines composed by someone else, is not in general quoting the lines.'

p.207—'...the dependency of writing on spoken language is a contingent fact about the history of human languages and not a logical truth about the nature of language.'

p.208—'the necessary presupposition of the forms which that intentionality takes.'


+++++++++++++++++++
++ 4, September 26th ++
+++++++++++++++++++
Reframing Framing and Quest(ion)ing
++
++ Heidegger, Martin. "The Question Concerning Technology/Die Frage Nach der Technik" (entire book is uploaded here but just read this essay from it)
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
p.xiv—'Heidegger is not a "primitive" or a "romantic." He is not one who seeks escape from the burdens and responsibilities of contemporary life into serenity, either through a re-creating of some idyllic past or through the exalting of some simple experience. Finally, Heidegger is not a foe of technology and science. He neither disdains nor rejects them as though they were only destructive of human life.¶ The roots of Heidegger's thinking lie deep in the Western philosophical tradition. Yet that thinking is unique in many of its aspects, in its language and in its literary expression. In the development of his thought, Heidegger has been taught chiefly by the Greeks, by German idealism, by phenomenology, and by the scholastic theological tradition. These and other elements have been fused by his genius of sensitivity and intellect into very individual philosophical expression.¶ In approaching Heidegger's work the reader must ask not only what he says, but how he says it. For here form and content are inextricably united. The perceptive reader will find at hand in the literary form of each one of these essays many keys to unlock its meaning. He will also find the content of each continually shaping for itself forms admirably suited to its particular expression.¶ For Heidegger true thinking is never an activity performed in abstraction from reality. It is never man's ordering of abstractions simply in terms of logical connections. Genuine thinking is, rather man's most essential manner of being man... Man in thinking is called upon to lend a helping hand to Being.'

p.xv—'...Being is the Being of whatever is. Ruling in whatever is, yet transcending and governing the latter in the particularity of its presencing, Being may perhaps best be said to be the ongoing manner in which everything that is, presences; i.e., it is the manner in which, in the lastingness of time, everything encounters man and comes to appearance through the openness that man provides...Being is the very opposite of an abstraction fashioned by human thought... it is "what is given to thinking to think.". True thinking should not concern itself with some arcane and hidden meaning, but with "something lying near, that which lies nearest," which, in virtue of that very nearness, man's thinking can readily fail to notice at all (WN 111). Being rules in whatever is—in the particular and in the far-ranging complexity of the whole—thereby constantly approaching and concerning man. "In the 'is,'" spoken of anything real whatever," 'Being' is uttered" (T 46). ¶ Being manifests itself continually anew. In keeping with this, thinking can never be for Heidegger a closed system. Rather is it the traveling of a road. Each thinker goes along a way that is peculiarly his own. In a fundamental sense it is the way and not the individual that assembles what is thought, that provides bounds and lets everything stand in relation to everything else.¶ Heidegger's writings exemplify this centrality of the way for him.'

p.3—'Questioning builds a way.'

pp.4, 5—'Technology is not equivalent to the essence of technology. When we are seeking the essence of "tree," we have to become away that That which pervades every tree, as tree, is not itself a tree that can be encountered among all the other trees.¶ Likewise, the essence of technology is by no means anything technological. Thus we shall never experience our relationship to the essence of technology so long as we merely conceive and push forward the technological, put up with it, or evade it. Everywhere we remain unfree and changed to technology whether we passionately affirm or deny it. But we are delivered over to in the worst possible way when we regard it as something neutral; for this conception of it, (2) to which today we particularly like to do homage, makes us utterly blind to the essence of technology.¶ According to ancient doctrine, the essence of a thing is considered to be what the thing is. Everyone knows the two statements that answer our question. One says: Technology is a means to an end. The other says: Technology is a human activity. The two definitions of technology belong together. For to posit ends and procure and utilize the means to them is a human activity. The manufacture and utilization of equipment, tools, and machines, the manufactured and used things themselves, and the needs and ends that they serve, all belong to what technology is. The whole complex of these contrivances is technology. Technology itself is a contrivance, or, in, Latin, and instrumentum. (3)¶ The current conception of technology, according to which it is a means and a human activity, can therefore be called the instrumental and anthropological definition of technology.'

p.5—'The will to mastery becomes all the more urgent the more technology threatens to slip from human control.'

p.8, 9—'In what does this playing in unison of the four ways of being responsible play? What is the source of the unity of the four causes? What, after all, does this owing and being responsible mean, thought as the Greeks thought it?'

p.12—'But where have we strayed to? We are questioning concerning technology, and we have arrived now at aletheia, at revealing. What has the essence of technology to do with revealing? The answer: everything. For every bringing-forth is grounded in revealing. Bringing-forth, indeed, gathers within itself the four modes of occasioning—causality—and rules them throughout. Within its domain belong end and means, belongs instrumentality. (11) Instrumentality is considered to be the fundamental characteristic of technology. If we inquire, step by step, into what technology, represented as means, actually is, then we shall arrive at revealing. The possibility of all productive manufacturing lies in revealing.¶ Technology is therefore no mere means. Technology is a way of revealing. If we give heed to this, then another whole realm for the essence of technology will open itself up to us. it is the realm of revealing, i.e., of truth. (12)' == INTERNET?!? Maybe the internet and elements like rule 34 reveal a truth about human nature instead of empirical "truth" per say?=="This prospect strikes us as strange. Indeed, it should do so, should do so as persistently as possible and with so much urgency that we will finally take seriously the simple question of what the name "technology" means.'

p.15—'It sets upon it in the sense of challenging it. Agriculture is now the mechanized food industry. Air is now set upon to yield nitrogen, the earth to yield ore, ore to yield uranium, for example; uranium is set upon to yield atomic energy, which can be released either for destruction of for peaceful use.'

p.18—'Where and how does this revealing happen if it is no mere handiwork of man? We need not look far. We need only apprehend in an unbiased way That which has already claimed man and has done so, so decisively that he can only be man at any given time as the one so claimed. Wherever man opens his eyes and ears, unlocks his heart, and gives himself over to meditation and striving, shaping and working, entreating and thanking, he finds himself everywhere already brought into the unconcealed. The unconcealment of the unconcealed has already come to pass whenever it calls man forth into the modes of revealing allotted to him. When man, in his way, from within unconcealment reveals that which presences, he merely responds to the call of unconcealment even when he contradicts it. Thus when man, investigating, observing, ensnares nature as an area of his on conceiving, he has already been claimed by a way of revealing that challenges him to approach nature as an object of research, until even the object disappears in the objectlessness of standing-reserve.'


p.21—'Modern physics is not experimental physics because it applies apparatus to the questioning of nature. Rather the reverse is true. Because physics, indeed already as pure theory, sets nature up to exhibit itself as a coherence of forces calculable in advance, it therefore orders its experiments precisely for the purpose of asking whether and how nature reports itself when set up in this way.'

p.23—'...physics, in all its retreating from the representation turned only toward objects that has alone been standard till recently, will never be able to renounce this one thing: that nature reports itself in some way or other that is identifiable through calculation and that it remains orderable as a system of information. This system is determined, then, out of a causality that has changed once again.'

'...what Enframing itself actually is? It is nothing technological, nothing on the order of a machine. It is the way in which the real reveals itself as standing-reserve.'

p.25, 26—'Always the unconcealment of that which is (22) goes upon a way of revealing. Always the destining of revealing holds complete sway over man. But that destining is never a fate that compels. For man becomes truly free only insofar as he belongs to the realm of destining and so becomes one who listens and hears [Hörender], and not one who is simply constrained to obey [Höriger].¶ The essence of freedom is originally not connected with the will or even with the causality of human willing.¶ Freedom governs the open in the sense of the cleared and lighted up, i.e., of the revealed. (23) It is to the happening of revealing, i.e., of truth, that freedom stands in the closest and most intimate kinship. All revealing belongs within a harboring and a concealing itself. All revealing comes out of the open, goes into the open, and brings into the open. The freedom of the open consists neither in unfettered arbitrariness nor in the constraint of mere laws. Freedom is that which conceals in a way that opens to light, in whose cleaning there shimmers that veil that covers what comes to presence of all truth and lets the veil appear as what veils. Freedom is the realm of the destining that at any give time starts a revealing upon its way.The essence of modern technology lies in Enframing. Enframing belongs within the destining of revealing. These sentences express something different from the talk that we hear more frequently, to the effect that technology is the fate of our age, where "fate" means the inevitableness of an unalterable course.¶ But when we consider the essence of technology, then we experience Enframing as a destining of revealing. In this way we are already sojourning within the open space of destining, a destining that in no way confines us to a stultified compulsion to push on blindly with technology or, what comes to the same thing, to rebel helplessly against it and curse it as the work of the devil. Quite to the contrary, when we once upon ourselves expressly to the essence of technology, we find ourselves unexpectedly taken into a freeing claim.'

p.26—'The destining of revealing is in itself not just any danger, but danger as such.¶ Yet when destining reigns in the mode of Enraming, it is the supreme danger. This danger attests itself to us in two ways. As soon as what is unconcealed no longer concerns man even as object, but does so, rather, exclusively as standing-reserve, and man in the midst of objectlessness is nothing but the orderer of the standing-reserve, then he comes to the very brink of a precipitous fall;'

p.28—'The rule of Enframing threatens man with the possibility that it could be denied to him to enter into a more original revealing and hence to experience the call of a more primal truth.¶ Thus, where Enframing reigns, there is danger in the highest sense.¶ "But where danger is, grows\The saving power also."¶ Let us think carefully about these words of Hölderlin. What does it mean "to save"? <CTRL/CMD + s>... might not an adequate look into what Enframing is as a destining of revealing bring into appearance the saving power in its arising?¶ In what respect does the saving power grow there also where the danger is?'

external image crisis.jpg

p.33—'When we consider, finally, that the coming to presence of the essence of technology comes to pass in the granting that needs and uses man so that he may share in revealing, then the following becomes clear: <does it?>¶ The essence of technology is in a lofty sense ambiguous. <doesn't seem all that clear to me : > Such ambiguity points to the mystery of all revealing, i.e., of truth.'

p.34—'Once there was a time when the bringing-forth of the true into the beautiful was called techne. And the poeisis of the fine arts was also called techne.'==spectacle + truth?'

'...poetically dwells man upon this earth.'

p.35—'...the essence of technology is nothing technological, essential reflection upon technology and decisive confrontation with it must happen in the realm that is, on the one hand, akin to the essence of technology and, on the other, fundamentally different from it.¶ Such a realm is art. But certainly only if reflection on art, for its part, does not shut its eyes to the constellation of truth after which we are questioning.¶ Thus questioning, we bear witness to the crisis that in our sheer preoccupation with technology we do not yet experience the coming to presence of technology, that in our sheer aesthetic-mindedness we no longer guard and preserve the coming to presence of art. Yet the more questioningly we ponder the essence of technology, the more mysterious the essence of art becomes.¶ The closer we come to danger, the more brightly do the ways into the saving power begin to shine and the more questioning we become. For questioning is the piety of thought'


++
++ Weber, Samuel. "Upsetting the Frame"
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p.55—'Lyotard'

p.66—'...the problem of representational thought imposes itself in an intensely practical way, calling into question conventional styles of academic writing, scholarly or critical.'

p.62—'As a verb, wesen signifies "to hold sway", to "stay in play" (im Spiel bleiben) ('FT', 30), to "go on". I therefore propose to translate Wesen, in this particular context, as goings-on.¶ The goings-on of technics are on-going, not just in the sense of being long-standing, staying in play, lasting, but in the more dynamic one of moving away from the idea of a pure and simple self-identity of technology. What goes on in and as technics, its Wisen, is not itself technical.'

p.65—'"Habouring forth"... is a movement from the inside out, as it were, in which self-identity is subordinated to and determined as a change of place.'

p.68—'...preindustrial agriculture, that is... a form of cultivation through witch technics cooperates to bring forth "openings" initiated more or less spontaneously but which require external intervention in order to come forth fully.'

p.74—'They set in place, but the fixity of such place-setting turns into a placing of orders that can never stop. The more technics seeks to place the subject into safety, the less safe its places become. The more it seeks to place its orders, the less orderly are its emplacements. The more representational thinking and acting strive to present their subject matter, the less the subject matters, the more it idealizes itself as pure will, as the Will to Will.¶ One need not look very far today to find confirmation of this spiral. Rarely has the complicity between technocracy and voluntarism been as manifest as it is today.'


++
++ Ronell, Avital. The Telephone Book (selections)
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
p.20—'In addition, he only took a call from
Princeton.........................................................................
.........................................................The Maternalizing Call'

p.26—'The Local Call



S
t
o
r
m

T
r
o
o
p
e
r

t
o

r
e
g
g
e
d
i
e
H'


p.29—'SPIEGEL:
So you finally accepted.
How did you then relate HEIDEGGER:
to the Nazis?' ...someone from the top
command of the Storm
Trooper University Bureau,
SA section leader Baumann
called me up. He
demanded...(I, 6)'

p.31—'
Indeed the call is precisely
something which we ourselves
have neither planned nor
prepared for nor voluntarily per-
formed, nor have we ever
done so. [" 'Es' ruft,"] "It" calls,
against our expectations
and even against our will
(BT, 275)'

p.34—'S:
However, in your 1935 lecture,
printed in 1953 as "introduction
to Metaphysics," you said,
"what is today being offered as
the philosophy of Nazim has
not the slightest to do with the
inner truth and greatness of
that movement (namely with
the encounter between plane-
tary technology and modern
man). Meanwhile the so-called
philosophy of National Social-
ism fishes in the murky waters
of 'Values' and 'Wholes.'" Did
you insert the bracketed words
in 1953 to make plain to the
reader what you had meant in
1935 by "the inner truth and
greatness of this movement" or
were they already there in 1935?'

p.35—'
H:
The phrase was in my manu-
script and represented my then
view of technology and not my
later exposition of technology
as Frame-Work (Ge-Stell). I did
not develop the point because I
thought my listeners would un-
derstand what I was getting at.
As you might expect, fools,
stool pigeons and spies under-
stood it otherwise, as they well
might. (i, 16)'

p.42—'"Heideg-
ger. Well, cancel that remark." (I, 26).---------------------------------------'

p.43—' _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ '

pp.232–3—'– ···· · · – ·· – – – – – '—THEAUTO

pp.236–7—'· – – · ···· – · – – The Autobiography'—PHY

p.240—'The hierarchically tuned sound filters extend the young inventor's ears to church music, from which they recoil. Thus another organ suffers atrophy: "And listening o much to the poor organ in that church has spoiled organ music for me ever since. Even now, an organ seems to sing through it nose no matter how good the instrument or how skilled the player" (A, 11)'

p.240–1—'His capacity for _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ...
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
spiritual insight would make him a keen soul-sister to Liang's Julie or Jung's Miss St. or even Heidegger's Trakl:'

p.242–3—DANCING NOTATION!?! Best. Assignment. EVER.

p.245—Candlestick? Phone hanger?

p.255—'The two tines expand to three tines;
the hand

::: comes into the picture,

and a certain sentiment of

GUILT.'

p.257—'The phone was conceived as their baby. They hasten to advance its infancy, eager to have their child talk: The telephone...

I MADe every parT OF THAT First famous teLEPHOne with mY OWN HAnds, but I must conFESS My prophetic POWers, if I had any, WERE Not in operATION THAT day. Not for a mOMENT Did I realiZE WHAT a tremendouslY IMPORTant pieCE OF WORK I Was doing.'

p.260–1—'\/ ... /\'

p.262—'Ever since Watson had known Bell, he recounts, his habit of celebrating successful experiments by what he called a war dance was respected, and "I had got so expert at it that I could do it as well as he could. That night, when he got back to the laboratory, we forgot there were other people in the house and has a rejoicing that nearly resulted in a catastrophe" (A, 95-96).'

p.263—'Yet the inevitability–at however long a distance—of noise as a by-product of this innovation in the speech conveyance has just been announced to the landlady whose figure is firmly planted to the ground. This may be the birth of
a new noise era
whose contours make Kafka's thin text,
"The Neighbor,"
explode.'

++
++ Lyotard, Jean-François. Heidegger and "the jews"
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
p.23—'A motive lost in the very principle of progress, soul lost in the spirit'

++
++ Rheinberger, Hans-Jörg. 1998. Experimental Systems, Graphematic Spaces. In Inscribing Science: Scientific Texts and the Materiality of Communication, edited by T. Lenoir. Palo Alto: Stanford University Press.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


++
++ Ronell, Avital. “Proving Grounds,” The Test Drive, pp. 5-57.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++



+++++++++++++++++++
++ 3, September 19th ++
+++++++++++++++++++
The It Is Langauged Like a Structure
++
++ Felman, Shoshana. Jacques Lacan and the Adventure of Insight (selection)
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
p.1—All I can do is tell the truth. No, that isn't so—l have missed it. There is no truth that, in passing through awareness, does not lie. But one runs after it all the same.” Lacan, The Four Fundamental Concepts of Psychoanalysis’
“…I have missed it << All I can do is… >> one runs after… << I have missed it. >> There is no truth… in passing through >> awareness, does not lie.”
[ d ]
p.9—‘Lacan is thus a metaphor—or a symptom—of psychoanalysis itself, insofar as psychoanalysis is reenacting a constant revolution in the most basic human questions:
What does it mean to be human?
What does it mean to think? and consequently,
What does it mean to be contemporary?'
This is, in Lacan’s perspective, what the revolution called psychoanalysis is forcing us to question and requestion. And this is, in effect, the real subject of my book.’
p.15—‘The Blindness of Insight or Thinking Beyond Our Means’
p.15, 16—‘This book, then, is an attempt to explore some of the key possibilities that Lacan has opened up—for psychoanalysis, for culture, and for reading; and attempt to illuminate a way of reading whose unending struggle to become aware was able, in the process, to become attentive to messages or items of signification that were formerly unusable and, as such, unreadable, inaudible, invisible. This is, in my view, the quintessential service that Lacan has rendered to our culture: to have derived from Freud a way of reading whose unprecedented thrust of achievement is to keep an entire system of signification open, rather than foreclose it, so that the small, unnoticeable message can grow, by virtue of the fact that the big ones are kept still, open and suspended. In trying here to both illuminate and to practice this way of reading, I hope not simply to repay a small share of the debt of inspiration Lacan has given me, but to do Lacan, psychoanalysis, and all those who are interested in insight a justice of a different order, by making these creative possibilities, and this access route to insight, a little more accessible to all of us—in our theories as well as in our lives.’
^^ “What does it mean to be human?
What does it mean to think? And consequently,
What does it mean to be contemporary?”¬¬
p.20—‘It is true that words are what we read; and in this case we have to read Lacan’s words, from which we have to learn how to read. But language for Lacan (even his own) is something altogether other than a list of terms to be mastered. It is rather something like a list of terms we should be transformed by, a list of terms into which to write, or to translate, ourselves.’ || We are what we read.
p.21—‘…interpreting is what takes place on both sides of the analytic situation. The unconscious, in Lacan’s eyes, is not simple the objet of psychoanalytical investigation, but its subject. The unconscious, in other words, is not simply that which must be read but also, and perhaps primarily, that which reads. The unconscious is a reader. What this implies most radically is that whoever reads, interprets out of his unconscious, is an analysand, even when the interpreting is done from the position of the analyst…. “…desire is interpretation itself. (S xi.161, N 175; tm)”’
p.23—‘Freud’s discovery of the unconscious is the outcome of his reading of the hysterical discourse of his patients, of his being capable of reading in the hysterical discourse of the Other his own unconscious. The discovery of the unconscious is therefore Freud’s discovery, within the discourse of the other, of what was actively reading within himself: his discovery, or his reading, of what was reading—in what was being read. Freud’s discovery, for Lacan, thus consists not—as it is conventionally understood—of the revelation of new meaning (the unconscious) but of the practical discovery of a new way of reading.
p.27—‘To account for poetry in psychoanalytical terms has traditionally meant to analyze poetry as a symptom of a particular poet. I would here like to reverse this approach, and to analyze a particular poet as a symptom of poetry.’
p.29—‘“Poe,” writes Bernard Shaw, “constantly and inevitably produced magic where is greatest contemporaries produced only beauty.”’
»» discussing the nature of language »|« interpretively dancing about the nature of interpretive dance ««
p.30—‘Poe’s detractor seem to be unaware, however, of the paradox that underlies their enterprise: it is by no means clear why anyone should take the trouble to write—at length—about a writer of no importance. Poe’s most systematic denouncer, Ivor Winters, thus writes:
The menace lies not, primarily, in his impressionistic admirers among literary people of whom he still has some, even in England and in America, where a familiarity with his language ought to render his crudity obvious, for these individuals in the main do not make themselves permanently very effective: it lies rather in the impressive body of scholarship… When a writer is supported by a sufficient body of such scholarship, a very little philosophical elucidation will suffice to establish him in the scholarly world as a writer whose greatness is self-evident. (Recognition, p. 177)’
p.33—‘Krutch thus diagnoses in Poe a pathological condition of sexual impotence, the result of a fixation on his mother, and explains Poe’s literary drive as a desire to compensate for, on the one hand, the loss of social position which his foster father had deprived him, through the acquisition of literary fame and, on the other hand, his incapacity to have normal sexual relations, through the creation of a fictional world of sorrow and destruction where he found refuge. Poe’s fascination with logic would thus be merely an attempt to prove himself rational when he felt h was going insane; and his critical theory merely an attempt to justify his peculiar artistic practice.’ == Krutch’s reading from his own subconscious || me || everyone?
p.35—‘Krutch’s approach does not, then, make sophisticated use of psychoanalytic insights, nor does it address the crucial question of the relationship between psychology and aesthetics, nor does it see the crux of this question sis not so much in the interrogation of whether or not all artists are necessarily pathological, but of what it is that makes of art—not of the artist—an object of desire for the public; of what it is that makes for art’s effect, for the compelling power of Poe’s poetry over its readers. The question of what make poetry lies, indeed, not so much in what it was that made Poe write, but in what it is that makes us read him and that ceaselessly drives so many people to write about it.’
p.43—‘The analyst’s effectiveness, however, does not spring from his intellectual strength but—insists Lacan—from his position in the repetitive structure. By virtue of his occupying the third position—that is, the locus of the unconscious of the subject as a place of substitution of letter for letter (of signifier for signifier)—the analyst, through transference, allows at once for a repetition of the trauma and for a symbolic substitution, and thus effects the drama’s denouement.’
p.44—‘…repetition is not of sameness but of difference, not of independent terms or analogous themes but of a structure of differential interrelationships, in which what returns is always other. Thus, the triangular structure repeats itself only through the difference of the characters who successively come to occupy the three positions: its structural significance is perceived only through this difference.’
p.15—‘…poetry and psychoanalysis… both exist only insofar as they resist our reading. When caught in the act, both are always already, once again, purloined.’
p.67—‘True originality, in other words, is precisely the way in which a reflexive movement, in returning to and upon itself, in effect subverts itself—finds something other than what it had expected, what it had set out to seek; the way in which the answer is bound in effect to displace the question; the way in which what is revolving, what returns to itself, radically displaces the very point of observation. This, at least, was the originality of Freud’s discovery, and of Lacan’s rediscovery—of Freud.’

++
++ Jason Glynos and Yanis Stavrakakis (2001), "Postures and Impostures: On Lacan's Style and Use of Mathematical Science," American Imago 58(3):685-706.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
p.686—No one likes to feel stupid. A very rare person indeed is she who, having struggled to make sense of Lacans Écrits, has not entertained such thoughts of vulnerability. This vulnerability is only exacerbated if a Lacanian seminar or essay has been recommended as reading material by a friend or professor whom we respect. It is a vulnerability that can very quickly turn to frustration, intimidation, and even anger.¶ Just imagine, then, what would happen if someone came along and declared Lacan to be an impostor. Let us assume, futher, that this someone is a well-respected scientist, no less. Current affairs commentaries, press releases, editorials, and radio programs suddenly become flooded with the common knowledge that the emperor has no clothes; that Lacans difficult, even tortuous, discourse is nothing more than an exercise in obscurantism of Joycean proportions; that Lacans mathematical forays bear absolutely no relation to psychoanalysis. Just imagine the relief and satisfaction! In a society governed by the sound-bite imperative, we can now with clear consciences set aside that weighty volume.’
p.691—‘…Lacan (196970) took an extremely critical view of pedagogically styled discourse, always cautioning his audience to resist understanding too quickly. This does not mean that Lacan believed the obviously absurd view that pedagogy has no place in our society; only that he deliberately declined to adopt it himself in the delivery of his seminars and writings. Consider, for example, the following quotation: I am not surprised that my discourse can cause a certain margin of misunderstanding, but this is done with an express intention, absolutely deliberate, that I pursue this discourse in a way that offers you the occasion of not completely understanding it (quoted in Samuels 1993, 16). Or elsewhere: “you are not obliged to understand my writings. If you don’t understand them, so much the better—that will give you the opportunity to explain them” (Lacan 1975, 34).’
p.691, 692—‘...resist understanding too quickly... To understand something means to translate a term into other terms that we are already familiar with. ... instead of being open to something new and different, ...effectively reinforce... self-understanding.’
p.692—‘Ultimately, Lacans point is an ethical one, finding application not just in the clinic, but in theoretical work and quotidian life as well. It has to do with taking responsibility for ones understanding, rather than relying on a consensus of understanding. And the strategy he chose to adopt in this regard involved systematically creating a margin of nonunderstanding. He recognized in this strategy its potential productivenessproductive in terms of generating a desire for responsible understanding and in terms of generating research. In short, Lacan is not celebrating misunderstanding. Rather, he is making an argument in favour of responsible understanding.’
p.695—the Lacanian idea that to understand someone too quickly is to misunderstand her.”’
p.703—‘Had it not been for S&B’s link to the scientific establishment—an institution whose authority one tends to accept without question—Intellectual Impostures would not have seen the light of day.10’
p.704—‘We close with a Lacanian hypothesis, suggesting that its success is buoyed up by a satisfaction or enjoyment (jouissance) that has at least two sources: (1) the fun poked at French intellectuals who are difficult to understand; and (2) the fun poked at those who poke fun at French intellectuals. It is not so easy to steer clear of these two sources of satisfaction.’


++
++ Slavoj Zizek, Looking Awry: An Introduction to Lacan Through Popular Culture
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+ PREFACE
p.2‘Marriage, Kant wrote, is "a contract between two adult persons of the opposite sex on the mutual use of their sexual organs."’
p.3—‘Lacan's "return to Freud" is usually associated with his motto "the unconscious is structured like a language," i.e., with an effort to unmask imaginary fascination and reveal the symbolic law that governs it.’
+ 1 HOW REAL IS REALITY?
p.6—‘The libidinal economy of Tantalus's torments is notable: they clearly exemplify the Lacanian distinction between need, demand, and desire, i.e., the way an everyday object destined to satisfy some of our needs undergoes a kind of transubstantiation as soon as it is caught in the dialectic of demand and ends up producing desire. When we demand an object from somebody, its "use value" (the fact that it serves to satisfy some of our needs) eo ipso becomes a form of expression of its "exchange value"; the object in question functions as an index of a network of intersubjective relations. If the other complies with our wish, he thereby bears witness to a certain attitude toward us. The final purpose of our demand for an object is thus not the satisfaction of a need attached to it but confirmation of the other's attitude toward us. When, for example, a mother gives milk to her child, milk becomes a token of her love. The poor Tantalus thus pays for his greed (his striving after "exchange value") when every object he obtains loses its ''use value" and changes into a pure, useless embodiment of "exchange value": the moment he bites into food, it changes to gold.’
p.44‘We are of the opinion that in every structure there is a lure, a place-holder of the lack, comprised by what is perceived, but at the same time the weakest link in a given series, the point which vacillates and only seems to belong to the actual level: in it is compressed the whole virtual level [of the structuring space]. This element is irrational in reality, and by being included in it, it indicates the place of lack in it. 3’
p.43—In a dream, ''things" themselves are already "structured like a language," their disposition is regulated by the signifying chain for which they stand. The signified of this signifying chain, obtained by means of a retranslation of "things" into "words," is the "dream-thought." On the level of meaning, this "dream-thought" is in no way connected in its content with objects depicted in the dream (as in the case of a rebus, whose solution is in no way connected with the meaning of the objects depicted in it). If we look for the "deeper, hidden meaning" of the figures appearing in a dream, we blind ourselves to the latent "dream-thought" articulated in it. The link between immediate "dream-contents" and the latent "dream-thought" exists only on the level of wordplay, i.e., of nonsensical signifying material. Remember Aristander's famous interpretation of the dream of Alexander of Macedon, reported by Artemidorus? Alexander "had surrounded Tyre and was besieging it but was feeling uneasy and disturbed because of the length of time the siege was taking. Alexander dreamt he saw a satyr dancing on his shield. Aristander happened to be in the neighborhood of Tyre... By dividing the word for satyr into sa and tyros he encouraged the king to press home the siege so that he became master of the city." As we can see, Aristander was quite uninterested in the possible "symbolic meaning" of the figure of a dancing satyr (ardent desire? joviality?): instead, he focused on the word and divided it, thus obtaining the message of the dream: sa Tyros = Tyre is thine.’
p.71—THE OTHER MUST NOT KNOW ALL—‘It would be wrong to conclude from the "nonexistence of the big Other," i.e., from the fact that the big Other is just a retroactive illusion masking the radical contingency of the real, that we can simply suspend this "illusion" and "see things as they really are." The crucial point is that this "illusion" structures our (social) reality itself: its disintegration leads to a "loss of reality"—or, as Freud puts it in The Future of an Illusion, after conceiving religion as an illusion: "Must not the assumptions that determine our political regulations be called illusions as well?"1¶ One of the key scenes in Hitchcock's Saboteur, the charity dance in the palace of the wealthy Nazi spy posing as a society lady, demonstrates perfectly the way the very superficiality of the big Other (the field of etiquette, social rules, and manners) remains the place where truth is determined and thus the place from which "the game is run." The scene sets up a tension between the idyllic surface (the politeness of the charity dance) and the concealed real action (the desperate attempt by the hero to snatch his girlfriend from the hands of the Nazi agents and to escape together with her). The scene takes place in a great hall, in full view of hundreds of guests. Both the hero and his adversaries have to observe the rules of etiquette appropriate to such an occasion; they are expected to engage in banal conversation, to accept an invitation to dance, etc., and the actions each of them undertakes against the adversary have to accord with the rules of the social game (when a Nazi agent wants to lead the hero's girlfriend away, he simply asks her for a dance, a request that, according to rules of politeness, she cannot refuse; when the hero wants to run away, he joins an innocent couple just taking their leave-the Nazi agents cannot stop him by [p.72—One Can Never Know Too Much about Hitchcock] force because this would expose them in the eyes of the couple; and so on). It is true that this renders action difficult (to deal a blow against the adversary, our action must inscribe itself in the texture of the surface social game and pass for a socially acceptable act), but an even more rigorous limitation is imposed upon our adversary: if we succeed in inventing such a "doubly inscribed" act, he is confined to the role of the impotent observer, he cannot strike back because he is also prohibited from violating the rules. Such a situation enables Hitchcock to develop the intimate connection between the gaze and the couple power/impotence. The gaze denotes at the same time power (it enables us to exert control over the situation, to occupy the position of the master) and impotence (as bearers of a gaze, we are reduced to the role of passive witnesses to the adversary's action) The gaze, in short, is a perfect embodiment of the "impotent Master," one of the central figures of the Hitchcockian universe.¶ This dialectic of the gaze in its connection with both power and impotence was articulated for the first time in Poe's "The Purloined Letter." When the minister steals the incriminating letter from her, the Queen sees what is going on, though she can do nothing but impotently observe his actions. Any action on her part would betray her to the King, who is also present but who does not know and must not know anything about the incriminating letter (which probably reveals some amorous indiscretion of the Queen). The crucial point to be noted is that the situation of the "impotent gaze" is never dual, it is never a simple confrontation between a subject and an adversary. A third element is always involved (the King in "The Purloined Letter," the ignorant guests in the Saboteur) that personifies the innocent ignorance of the big Other (the rules of the social game) from which we must hide our true designs. What we have then are three elements: an innocent third who sees all but fails to grasp the real significance of what he sees; the agent whose act-under the guise of simply following the rules of the social game taking place-deals a decisive blow to the adversary; and, finally, the adversary himself, the impotent observer who apprehends perfectly the real implication of the act, but is nonetheless condemned to the role of a passive Witness, since his counteraction would provoke the suspicion of the innocent, ignorant big Other. The fundamental pact uniting the actors of the social game is thus that the Other must not know all. This nonknowledge of the Other opens up a certain distance that, so to speak, gives us breathing space, i.e., that allows us to confer upon our actions a supplementary meaning beyond the one that is socially acknowledged. For this very reason, the social game (the rules of etiquette, etc.), inthe very stupidity of its ritual, is never simply superficial. We can indulge in our secret wars only as long as the Other does not take cognizance of them, for at [How the Non-duped Err—p.73] the moment the Other can no longer ignore them, the social bond dissolves itself. A catastrophe ensues, similar to the one instigated by the child's observation that the emperor is naked. The Other must not know all: this is an appropriate definition of the nontotalitarian social field.2
----
2 In both The Thirty-Nine Steps and North by Northwest, we find scenes homologous to the one in Saboteur: in The Thirty-Nine Steps, it is the political reunion where Hannay, mistaken for the expected speaker, improvises a nonsensical political address; In North by Northwest, it is the auction scene In which Thornhill acts rudely and senselessly to provoke the arrival of the police’
p.88—‘This gaze-object appears in its purest form in a series of films in which the logic of nostalgia is brought to self-reference: Body Heat, Driver, Shane.’
p.165—The Nation-Thing… and Its Leftover—‘What is at stake in ethnic tensions is always the possession of the national Thing: the "other" wants to steal our enjoyment (by ruining our "way of life") and/or it has access to some secret, perverse enjoyment. In short, what gets on our nerves, what really bothers us about the "other," is the peculiar way he organizes his enjoyment (the smell of his food, his "noisy" songs and dances, his strange manners, his attitude to work in the racist perspective, the "other" is either a workaholic stealing our jobs or an idler living on our labor). The basic paradox is that our Thing is conceived as something inaccessible to the other and at the same time threatened by him; this is similar to castration which, according to Freud, is experienced as something that "really cannot happen," but whose prospect nonetheless horrifies us.’


++

++ Daniel W. Smith (2004), "The Inverse Side of the Structure: Zizek on Deleuze and Lacan," Criticism 46(4):635-650

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++



++
++ Christopher Hanlon (2001), "Psychoanalysis and the Post-Political: An Interview with Slavoj Zizek," New Literary History 32:1-21.

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+++++++++++++++++++
++ 2, September 12th ++
+++++++++++++++++++
Savage Pansies Wild Thought
++
++ Levi-Strauss, Claude. The Savage Mind (Chapter 1)
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p.1—THE SCIENCE OF THE CONCRETE—‘The man’s badness killed
the child’s poverty’
p.2—‘Every civilization tends to overestimate the objective orientation of its thought and this tendency is never absent. When we make the mistake of thinking that the Savage is governed solely by organic or economic needs, we forget that he levels the same reproach at us, and that to him his own desires for knowledge seems more balanced than ours:’
p.3—‘A biologist writes the following about pygmies of the Philippines:¶ Another characteristic of Negrito life, a characteristic which strikingly demarcates them from the surrounding Christian lowlanders, is their inexhaustible knowledge of the plant and animal kingdoms. This lore includes not only a specific recognition of a phenomenal number of plants, birds, animals, and insects, but also includes a knowledge of the habits and behaviour of each…’
p.4—‘Plants, like algebra, have a habit of looking alike and being different, or looking different and being alike; consequently mathematics and botany confuse me.’
p.4—‘I remember a wicked old Luchozi who brought bundles of dried leaves, roots and stems and told me about their uses. How far he was a herbalist and how far a witch-doctor I could never fathom, but I regret that I shall never possess his knowledge of African psychology and his art in the treatment of his fellow men, that, coupled with my scientific medical knowledge, might have made a most useful combination (Gilges, P. 20).’
Just realized the writings I find most interesting in this article are those that the author is quoting. Overall, this piece seems to be a very structuralistic examination of the overall level of sophistication in “savage” languages.
p.6—‘…the most basic postulate of science is that nature itself is orderly. . . . All theoretical science is ordering and if, systematics is equated with ordering, then systematics is synonymous with theoretical science (Simpson, p. 5).’
pp.6–7—“A native thinker makes the penetrating comment that ‘All sacred things must have their place’ (Fletcher 2, p.34). It could even be said that being in their place is what makes them sacred for if they were taken out of their place, even in thought, the entire order of the universe would be destroyed. Sacred objects therefore contribute to the maintenance of order in the universe by occupying the places allocated to them. Examined superficially and from the outside, the refinements of ritual can appear pointless. They are explicable by a concern for what one might call ‘micro-adjustment’ – the concern to assign every single creature, object or feature to a place within a class. The ceremony of the Hako among the Pawnee is particularly illuminating in this respect, although only because it has been so well analysed. The invocation which accompanies the crossing of a stream of water is divided into several parts, which correspond, respectively, to the moment when the travellers put their feet in water, the moment when they move them and the moment when the water completely covers their feet. The invocation to the wind separates the moment when only the wet parts of the body feel cool: ‘Now, we are ready to move forward in safety’ (id., pp. 77-8). As the informant explains: ‘We must address with song every object we meet, because Tira’wa (the supreme spirit) is in all things, everything we come to as we travel can give us help . . . ‘(id., pp 73, 81)”
p.7—‘…the first difference between magic and science is therefore that magic postulates a complete and all-embracing determinism. Science, on the other hand, is based on a distinction between levels: only some of these admit forms of determinism; on others the same forms of determinism are held not to apply. One can go further and think of the rigorous precision of magical thought and ritual practices as an expression of the unconscious apprehension of the truth of determinism, the mode in which scientific phenomena exist. In this view, the operations of determinism are divined and made use of in an all-embracing fashion before being known and properly applied, and magical rites and beliefs appear as so many expressions of an act of faith in a science yet to be born.’
pp.10–11—‘Myths and rites are far from being, as has often been held, the product of man’s ‘myth-making faculty’,* turning its back on reality. Their principal value is indeed to preserve until the present time the remains of methods of observation and reflection which were (and no doubt still are) precisely adapted to discoveries of a certain type: those which nature authorised [sic] from the starting point of a speculative organization and exploitation of the sensible world in sensible terms. This science of the concrete was necessarily restricted by its essence to results other than those destined to be achieved by the exact natural sciences but it was no less scientific and its results no less genuine. They were secured ten thousand years earlier and still remain at the basis of our own civilization.
----
* The phrase is from Bergson, op. cit., ‘fonction fabulatrice’ (trans. note).’
pp.14-15—art lies half-way between scientific knowledge and mythical or magical thought. It is common knowledge that the artist is both something of a scientist and of a ‘bricoleur’. By his craftsmanship he constructs a material object which is also an object of knowledge. We have already distinguished the scientist and the ‘bricoleur’ by the inverse functions which they assign to events and structures as ends and means, the scientist creating
events (changing the world) by means of structures and the ‘bricoleur’ creating structures by means of events. This is imprecise in this crude form but our analysis makes it possible for us to refine it. Let us now look at this portrait of a woman by Clouet and consider the reason for the very profound aesthetic emotion which is, apparently inexplicably, aroused by the highly realistic, thread by thread, reproduction of a lace collar (Plate 1).
----
* ‘Bricolage’ also works with ‘secondary’ qualities, i.e. ‘second hand’.”
p.19—“To use a disrespectful analogy, ‘opportunity makes the thief’* in either case.
----
* In the original: ‘l’occasion fait le larron’ (trans. note).”
p.20—“All games are defined by a set of rules which in practice allow the playing of any number of matches. Ritual, which is also ‘played’, is on the other hand, like a favoured instance of a game, remembered from among the possible ones because it is the only one which results in a particular type of equilibrium between the two sides. The transposition is readily seen in the case of the Gahuku-Gama of New Guinea who have learnt football but who will play, several days running, as many matches as are necessary for both sides to reach the same score (Read, p. 429). This is treating a game as a ritual.”
p.21—native philosophy resolutely sides with the living: ‘Death is a hard thing. Sorrow is especially hard’
pp.21–22—Games thus appear to have a disjunctive effect: they end in the establishment of a difference between individual players or teams where originally there was no indication of inequality. And at the end of the game they are distinguished into winners and losers. Ritual, on the other hand, is the exact inverse; it conjoins, for it brings about a union (one might even say communion in this context) or in any case an organic relation between two initially separate groups, one ideally merging with the person of the officiant and the other with the collectivity of the faithful. In the case of games the symmetry is therefore preordained and it is of a structural kind since it follows from the principle that the rules are the same for both sides. Asymmetry is engendered: it follows inevitably from the contingent nature of events, themselves due to intention, chance or talent. The reverse is true of ritual. There is an asymmetry which is postulated in advance between profane and sacred, faithful and officiating, dead and living, initiated and uninitiated, etc., and the ‘game’ consists in making all the participants pass to the winning side by means of events, the nature and ordering of which is genuinely structural. Like science (though here again on both the theoretical and the practical plane) the game produces events by means of a structure; and we can therefore understand why competitive games should flourish in our industrial societies. Rites and myths, on the other hand, like ‘bricolage’ (which these same societies only tolerate as a hobby or pastime), take to pieces and reconstruct sets of events (on a psychical, socio-historical or technical plane) and use them as so many indestructible pieces for structural patterns in which they serve alternatively as ends or means.
Games as structures, rituals and spiritual practices as post-structures?

++
++ Jacques Derrida, "Structure, Sign, and Play in the Discourse of the Human Sciences," Writing and Difference, trans. Alan Bass. London: Routledge, pp 278-294 at http://hydra.humanities.uci.edu/derrida/sign-play.html
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‘Perhaps something has occurred in the history of the concept of structure that could be called an "event," if this loaded word did not entail a meaning which it is precisely the function of structural—or structuralist—thought to reduce or to suspect.’
‘…conserving in the field of empirical discovery all these old concepts, while at the same time exposing here and there their limits, treating them as tools which can still be of use. No longer is any truth-value attributed to them; there is a readiness to abandon them if necessary if other instruments should appear more useful. In the meantime, their relative efficacy is exploited, and they are employed to destroy the old machinery to which they belong and of which they themselves are pieces.’
‘Levi-Strauss will always remain faithful to this double intention: to preserve as an instrument that whose truth-value he criticizes.’
On the other hand, still in The Savage Mind, he presents as what he calls bricolage what might be called the discourse of this method. The bricoleur, says Levi-Strauss, is someone who uses "the means at hand," that is, the instruments he finds at his disposition around him, those which are already there, which had not been especially conceived with an eye to the operation for which they are to be used and to which one tries by trial and error to adapt them, not hesitating to change them whenever it appears necessary, or to try several of them at once, even if their form and their origin are heterogenous -- and so forth. There is therefore a critique of language in the form of bricolage, and it has even been possible to say that bricolage is the critical language itself. I am thinking in particular of the article by G[erard] Genette, "Structuralisme et Critique litteraire," published in homage to Levi-Strauss in a special issue of L'Arc, where it is stated that the analysis of bricolage could "be applied almost word for word'' to criticism, and especially to "literary criticism."
If one calls bricolage the necessity of borrowing one's concept from the text of a heritage which is more or less coherent or ruined, it must be said that every discourse is bricoleur. The engi~eer, whom Levi-Strauss opposes to the bricoleur, should be one to construct the totality of his language, syntax, and lexicon. In this sense the engineer is a myth. A subject who would supposedly be the absolute origin of his own discourse and would supposedly construct it "out of nothing," "out of whole cloth," would be the creator of the verbe, the verbe itself. The notion of the engineer who had supposedly broken with all forms of bricolage is therefore a theological idea; and since Levi-Strauss tells us elsewhere that bricolage is mythopoetic, the odds are that thee engineer is a myth produced by thebricoleur. From the moment that we cease to believe in such an engineer and in a discourse breaking with the received historical discourse, as soon as it is admitted that every finite discourse is bound by a cenain bricolage, and that the engineer and the scientist are also species of bricoleurs then the very idea of bricolage is menaced and the difference in which it took on its meaning decomposes.‘
‘…the concept of freeplay is important in Levi-Strauss. His references to all sorts of games… are very frequent, especially in his Conversations, in Race and Histotory, and in The Savage Mind. This reference to the game or free-play is always caught up in a tension.’
'Freeplay is always an interplay of absence and presence, but if it is to be radically conceived, freeplay must be conceived of before the alternativeof presence and absence; being must be conceived of as presence or absence beginning with the possibility of freeplay and not the other way around.'

++
++ Wikipedia articles on Levi-Strauss http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Levi-strauss
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The Savage Mind: Bricoleur and Engineer[edit source | editbetabeta]—‘Lévi-Strauss developed the comparison of the Bricoleur and Engineer in The Savage Mind. "Bricoleur" has its origin in the old French verb bricoler, which originally referred to extraneous movements in ball games, billiards, hunting, shooting and riding, but which today means do-it-yourself building or repairing things with the tools and materials on hand, puttering or tinkering as it were. In comparison to the true craftsman, whom Lévi-Strauss calls the Engineer, the Bricoleur is adept at many tasks and at putting preexisting things together in new ways, adapting his project to a finite stock of materials and tools. The Engineer deals with projects in their entirety, conceiving and procuring all the necessary materials and tools to suit his project. The Bricoleur approximates "the savage mind" and the Engineer approximates the scientific mind. Lévi-Strauss says that the universe of the Bricoleur is closed, and he often is forced to make do with whatever is at hand, whereas the universe of the Engineer is open in that he is able to create new tools and materials. But both live within a restrictive reality, and so the Engineer is forced to consider the preexisting set of theoretical and practical knowledge, of technical means, in a similar way to the Bricoleur.’

++
++ Wikipedia article on structuralism http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Structuralism
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OVERVIEW‘According to feminist theorist, Alison Assiter, four ideas are common to the various forms of structuralism. First, that a structure determines the position of each element of a whole. Second, that every system has a structure. Third, structural laws deal with co-existence rather than change. Fourth, structures are the "real things" that lie beneath the surface or the appearance of meaning.[9]
----
Assiter, Alison (June 1984). "Althusser and structuralism". British Journal of Sociology (London School of Economics) 35 (2): 272–296. doi:10.2307/590235.’


++
++ Chapters 1-7 of Daniel Chandler's //Semiotics for Beginners//
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++
++ Gilles Deleuze, "How Do We Recognize Structuralism?"
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++++++++++++++++++
++ 1, September 5th ++
++++++++++++++++++

“We experiment on the truth!”

++
++ Nietzsche, Friedrich. "The Gay Science." - http://ia701205.us.archive.org/35/items/Nietzsche-TheGayScience/Nietzsche-GaySciencewk.pdf
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p.44—‘I live in my own place
have never copied nobody even half,
and at any master who lacks the grace
to laugh at himself-I laugh.
OVER THE DOOR TO MY HOUSE’
Poem 28—Consolation for Beginners
‘See the child lost among swine,
Helpless, he can't even talk.
He is always, always cryin'-
Will he ever learn to walk?
Don’t despair! Soon he will treat
You to dances. It is said,
Once he can stand on his feet,
He will soon stand on his head.’

+ BOOK ONE
p.95, 22—L'ordre du jour pour Ie roi.‘Listen! Wasn’t that the bell? Damn! the day and the dance begin and we don't know the schedule! We have to improvise—all the world improvises its day. Let us proceed today as all the world does!’
p.116, 54—The consciousness of appearance.‘How wonderful and new and yet how gruesome and ironic I find my position vis-a-vis the whole of existence in the light of my insight! I have discovered for myself that the human and animal past, indeed the whole primal age and past of all sentient being continues in me to invent, to love, to hate, and to infer. I suddenly woke up in the midst of this dream, but only to the consciousness that I am dreaming and that I must go on dreaming lest I perish—as a somnambulist must go on dreaming lest he fall. What is “appearance” for me now? Certainly not the opposite of some essence: what could I say about any essence except to name the attributes of its appearance! Certainly not a dead mask that one could place on an unknown x or remove from it!¶ Appearance is for me that which lives and is effective and goes so far in its self-mockery that it makes me feel that this is appearance and will-o'-the-wisp and a dance of spirits and nothing more—that among all these dreamers, I, too, who “know” am dancing my dance; that the knower is a means for prolonging the earthly dance and thus belongs to the masters of ceremony of existence; and that the sublime consistency and interrelatedness of all knowledge perhaps is and will be the highest means to preserve the universality of dreaming and the mutual comprehension of all dreamers and thus also the continuation of the dream.44
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44 In other words: The world of our experience is shaped by our prerational past and may be likened to a dream. But even when we realize how the world of our experience lacks objectivity and independent reality, we still "must go on dreaming." What we experience is "appearance"; but there is no "essence" behind it that is somehow falsified. “Appearance" is not a mask that we might hope to remove from the face of an unknown x. There is no objective reality, no thing-in-itself; there is only appearance in one or another perspective.¶ These ideas are developed further in sections 51–59, then in Book III. and much later in the third and fourth chapters of Twilight of the Idols (VPN, 484-86). There are also many relevant notes in The Will to Power.’

+ BOOK TWO
p.131, 76—The greatest danger.—‘Thus the virtuous intellects are needed—oh, let me use the most unambiguous word—what is needed is virtuous stupidity, stolid metronomes for the slow spirit, to make sure that the faithful of the great shared faith stay together and continue their dance.’
pp.138/9, 84—On the origin of poetry.—‘…If we assumed that utility had always been venerated as the supreme deity, how could we possibly account for poetry?...¶ ­Well, in this case I have to side with the utilitarians. After all, they are right so rarely that it is really pitiful.In those ancient times in which poetry came into existence, the aim was utility, and actually a very great utility. When one lets rhythm permeate speech-the rhythmic force that reorders all the atoms of a sentence, bids one choose one's words with care, and gives one's thoughts a new color, making them darker, stranger, and more remote—the utility in question was superstitious. Rhythm was meant to impress the gods more deeply with a human petition, for it was noticed that men remember a verse much better than ordinary speech. It was also believed that a rhythmic tick-tock was audible over greater distances; a rhythmical prayer was supposed to get closer to the ears of the gods. Above all, men desired the utility of the elemental and overpowering effect that we experience in ourselves as we listen to music: rhythm is a compulsion; it engenders an unconquerable urge to yield and join in; not only our feet follow the beat but the soul does, too—probably, one surmised, the soul of the gods as well! Thus one tried to compel the gods by using rhythm and to force their hand: poetry was thrown at them like a magical snare.¶ …long before there were any philosophers, music was credited with the power of discharging the emotions. of purifying the soul, of easing the ferocia animi24—precisely by means of rhythm. When the proper tension and harmony of the soul had been lost, one had to dance, following the singer's beat: that was the prescription of this therapy. That is how Terpander25 put an end to a riot, how Empedocles26 soothed a raging maniac, and how Damon27 purified a youth who was pining away, being in love; and this was also the cure one tried to apply to the gods when the desire for revenge had made them rabid. Above all, one sought to push the exuberance and giddiness of the emotions to the ultimate extreme, making those who were in a rage entirely mad; and the vengeful, frenzied with lust for revenge. All orgiastic cults aim at discharging the ferocia of some deity all at once, turning it into an orgy, in order that the deity should feel freer and calmer afterward and leave man in peace. Etymologically, melos28 is a tranquilizer, not because it is tranquil itself but because its aftereffects make one tranquil.¶ It is not only in the cult song but also in worldly songs of the most ancient times that it is assumed that rhythm has a magical power. As one draws water or rows, for example, a song is supposed to cast a spell over the demons that one imagines at work in such cases; it makes them pliant and unfree so that they become man's instruments. Every action provides an occasion for song: every action depends on the assistance of spirits, and the magical song and the spell seem to be the primeval form of poetry.¶ …What could have been more useful for the ancient, superstitious type of man than rhythm? It enabled one to do anything-to advance some work magically; to force a god to appear, to be near, and to listen; to mold the future in accordance with one's will; to cleanse one's own soul from some excess (of anxiety, mania, pity, or vengefulness)—and not only one's own soul but also that of the most evil demon: without verse one was nothing; by means of verse one almost became a god. Such a fundamental feeling can never be erased entirely; and even now, after men have fought against such superstitions for thousands of years, the wisest among us are still occasionally fooled by rhythm—if only insofar as we sometimes consider an idea truer simply because it has a metrical form and presents itself with a divine skip and jump. Isn't it rather amusing that to this day the most serious philosophers, however strict they may be in questions of certainty, still call on what poets have said in order to lend their ideas force and credibility? And yet it is more dangerous for a truth when a poet agrees than when he contradicts it. For as Homer says: "Many lies tell the poets,"29
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24 Ferocity of the mind.
25 Greek lyrical poet of the early seventh century B.C.
26 Greek philosopher and poet of the fifth century B.C.
27 Athenian writer on music, mentioned in Plato's Republic 400 and 424, and discussed here and there in Nietzsche's early philological writings. In Nietzsche's notes for his lectures on "History of Greek Literature" (1875-76) all three incidents are mentioned together as above (Werke, Musarion edition. vol. V, p. 220).
28 Greek word for melody.
29 The irony of ending with an illustration of the very habit that has just been criticized is, of course, deliberate. Cf. the chapter “On Poets.”’
p.162, 105—The Germans as artists.—‘…their cramps are often no more than signs that they would like to dance—these poor bears in whom hidden nymphs and sylvan gods are carrying on—and at times even higher deities!’
p.162/3, 106—Music as an advocate.—I wish for the seedling to become a tree. For a doctrine to become a tree, it has to be believed for a good while; for it to be believed, it has to be considered irrefutable. The tree needs storms, doubts, worms, and nastiness to reveal the nature and the strength of the seedling; let it break if it is not strong enough. But a seedling can only be destroyed—not refuted.’

+ BOOK FOUR
p.255, 324—In media vita.49‘No, life has not disappointed me. On the contrary, I find it truer,50 more desirable and mysterious every year—ever since the day when the great liberator came to me: the idea that life could be an experiment of the seeker for knowledge—and not a duty, not a calamity, not trickery. —And knowledge itself: let it be something else for others; for example, a bed to rest on, or the way to such a bed, or a diversion, or a form of leisure—for me it is a world of dangers and victories in which heroic feelings, too, find places to dance and play. “Life as a means to knowledge”—with this principle in one's heart one can live not only boldly but even gaily, and laugh gaily, too. And who knows how to laugh anyway and live well if he does not first know a good deal about war and victory?51
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49 In mid-life.
50 wahrer. The Musarion edition has richer (reicher).
51 Cf. sections 283, 310, and 319—they furnish the best commentary.’

+ BOOK FIVE
p.322, 366—Faced with a scholarly book.‘We do not belong to those who have ideas only among books, when stimulated by books. It is our habit to think outdoors—walking, leaping, climbing, dancing, preferably on lonely mountains or near the sea where even the trails become thoughtful. Our first questions about the value of a book, of a human being, or a musical composition are: Can they walk? Even more, can they dance?’
p.324, 368—The cynic speaks.108‘My objections to the music of Wagner are physiological objections; why should I trouble to dress them up in aesthetic formulas? My "fact” is that I no longer breathe easily once this music begins to affect me; that my foot soon resents it and rebels; my foot feels the need for rhythm, dance, march; it demands of music first of all those delights which are found in good walking, striding, leaping, and dancing. But does not my stomach protest, too? my heart? my circulation? my intestines? Do I not become hoarse as I listen?¶ And so I ask myself: What is it that my whole body really expects of music? I believe, its own ease109: as if all animal functions should be quickened by easy, bold, exuberant, self-assured rhythms; as if iron, leaden life should be gilded by good golden and tender harmonies. My melancholy110 wants to rest in the hiding places and abysses of perfection: that is why I need music. What is the drama to me? What, the convulsions of its moral ecstasies which give the common people satisfaction? What, the whole gesture hocus-pocus of the actor?
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108 A revised version of this section was included by Nietzsche in his Nietzsche contra Wagner, under the title “Where I offer objections” (VPN, 664-66). A few of the changes Nietzsche made are noted below.
109 Erleichterung: being made easier, having a weight taken off.
110 Schwennut: literally, heavy mood, this is the ordinary word for melancholy.’
p.346, 381—On the question of being understandable.—I would not know what the spirit of a philosopher might wish more to be than a good dancer. For the dance is his ideal, also his art, and finally also his only piety, his "service of God."’
pp.347­/8, 383—Epilogue.—‘But as I slowly, slowly paint this gloomy question mark at the end160 and am still willing to remind my readers of the virtues of the right reader—what forgotten and unknown virtues they are!—it happens that I hear all around me the most malicious, cheerful, and koboldish laughter: the spirits of my own book are attacking me, pull my ears, and call me back to order. "We can no longer stand it," they shout at me; “away, away with this raven-black music! Are we not surrounded by bright morning? And by soft green grass and grounds, the kingdom of the dance? Has there ever been a better hour for gaiety? Who will sing a song for us, a morning song, so sunny, so light, so fledged that it will not chase away the blues161 but invite them instead to join in the singing and dancing? And even simple, rustic bagpipes would be better than such mysterious sounds, such swampy croaking, voices from the grave and marmot whistles as you have employed so far to regale us in your wilderness, Mr. Hermit and Musician of the Future!162 No! Not such tones! Let us strike up more agreeable, more joyous tones!"163¶ Is that your pleasure, my impatient friends? Well then, who would not like to please you? My bagpipes are waiting, and so is my throat—which may sound a bit rough; but put up with it, after all we are in the mountains. At least what you are about to hear is new; and if you do not understand it, if you misunderstand the singer, what does it matter? That happens to be “the singer's curse.”164 His music and manner you will be able to bear that much better, and to his pipes-dance that much better. Is that your will?
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160 The reference is to the last sentence of the preceding section.
161 Instead of "blues" the German has Grillen, twice: first in the sense of "the blues," moping, sadness; then in the literal sense of the word, “crickets.”
162 Zukunftsmusikant: Wagner's music had been known as Zukunftsmusik; Nietzsche's first book had been derided by a hostile philologist as "philology of the future"; and Nietzsche had come to refer occasionally to the philosophers of the future. Above all, cf. some of the preceding sections, such as 377 and 382.
163 In Beethoven's Ninth Symphony, the "Ode to Joy" (Freude)is introduced by a baritone, singing: “0 friends, not these tones. Let us strike up more agreeable, more joyous tones!”
164 The title of a famous ballad by Ludwig Uhland (1787-1862). In the poem, the singer pronounces the curse, calling down ruin upon a castle and telling a king that his very name shall be forgotten. Nietzsche is suggesting that it is the singer's curse not to be understood—even to be misunderstood. In context, he is referring particularly to the Appendix of Songs that follows immediately upon this section: even readers who fail to fathom these “songs” may enjoy them.’

+ SONGS OF PRINCE VOGELFREI
p.375—To the Minstral, A DANCING SONG—‘…Let us dance like troubadours / between holy men and whores, / between god and world beneath!’

++
++ Nietzsche’s Gay Science: Dancing Coherence by Monika Langer ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+ Dance and Dancing
xvii—“The coherence of The Gay science is multifaceted, creative coherence that eschews the tradition’s ponderous stance and reflects Nietzsche’s desire to dance with the pen.”
21—“The dance is a richly evocative, recurrent image in The Gay Science. In several ancient cultures the creation of the universe was attributed to a Goddess, whose primal dance created meaningful patterns from initially unformed elements. Traditionally, human dancing was crucial part of all religious rituals. It was thought to imitate cosmic creation and bring about a renewal, culminating in ecstatic union with the idety.10 By combining the metaphors of dancing and standing on one’s head, Nietzsche indicates creativity and renewal occur through union with the earth, not with a religious deity.¶ Yet such union might also imply an affirmation of the earth’s sacredness and of pre-patriarchal values. Nietzsche’s overturning can be interpreted as reversing Christianity, which condemned dancing and replace the Earth Goddess with a heavenly, patriarchal deity. The child figure in poem twenty-eight symbolizes potentiality and a new beginning. Its dancing suggests spontaneity, creativity, renewal, an exuberant lightness (rather than the heaviness of the spirit of gravity), a celebration of corporeality, and a harmonious integration of body, mind, and spirit.”
Other pages: 71–72, 112, 151, 221, 238, 257, 264
Other themes:
+ Laughing and laughter
+ Play and playfulness
+ Free-spiriting and free spirit, unfree spirit
+ Love
+ Music
+ Actors
+ Character
+ Creation and Creativity
+ Art, Artists
+ Gay science and gay scientists
+ Happiness and unhappiness or distress or misery
+ Masks and masquerade
+ Womanly nature
+ Artistic perspective

++
++ Blanchot, Maurice. 1993. “Reflections on Nihilism.” Pp. 136-170 in The Infinite Conversation. Translated by S. Hanson. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. Original edition, L'Entretien infini (Gallimard, 1969)
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p.136—‘… consider why the thought of nihilism… seems… almost naive and like the still tranquil dream of a "better" age.’
+ 3, Nietzsche and fragmentary writing
p.151/2—‘Let us admit … that … a continuous discourse may be behind these divided works. It remains nonetheless true that Nietzsche does not content himself with such a continuity. And even if a part of these fragments can be brought back to this kind of integral discourse, it is manifest that such a discourse—philosophy itself—is always already surpassed by Nietzsche; that he presupposes it rather than gives it exposition, in order, further on, to speak according to a very different language: no longer of the whole but of the fragment, of plurality, of separation.’
p.159—‘Fragmentary speech is barely speech—speech only at the limit. This does not mean that it speaks only at the end, but that in all times it accompanies and traverses all knowledge and all discourse with another language that interrupts speech by drawing it, in the turn of a redoubling, toward the outside where the uninterrupted speaks, the end that is never done with.

++
++ Michel Foucault, “Nietzsche, Genealogy, History,”
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p.76—‘1. Genealogy is gray, meticulous, and patiently documentary. It operates on a field of entangled and confused parchments, on documents that have been scratched over and recopied many times.’
I imagine this piece will be the kind of scholarly work that Nietzsche would describe as ‘somehow oppressive, oppressed’ in ‘Faced with a scholarly book’.
p.88/9—‘From these observations, we can grasp the particular traits of historical meaning as Nietzsche understood it—-the sense which opposes wirkliche Historie to traditional history. The former transposes the relationship ordinarily established between the eruption of an event and necessary continuity. An entire historical tradition (theological or rationalistic) aims at dissolving the singular event into an ideal continuity—as a teleological movement or a natural process. "Effective" history, however, deals with events in terms of their most unique characteristics, their most acute manifestations. An event, consequently, is not a decision, a treaty, a reign, or a battle, but the reversal of a relationship of forces, the usurpation of power, the appropriation of a vocabulary turned against those who had once used it, a feeble domination that poisons itself as it grows lax, the entry of a masked "other." The forces operating in history are not controlled by destiny or regulative mechanisms, but respond to haphazard conflicts. They do not manifest the successive forms of a primordial intention and their attraction is not that of a conclusion, for they always appear through the singular randomness of events. The inverse of the Christian world, spun entirely by a divine spider, and different from the world of the Greeks, divided between the realm of will and the great cosmic folly, the world of effective history knows only one kingdom, without providence or final cause, where there is only the “iron hand of necessity shaking the dice-box of chance." Chance is not simply the drawing of lots, but raising the stakes in every attempt to master chance through the will to power, and giving rise to the risk ofan even greater chance. The world we know is not this ultimately simple configuration where events are reduced to accentuate their essential traits, their final meaning, or their initial and final value. On the contrary, it is a profusionof entangled events. If it appears as a “marvelous motley, profound and totally meaningful,” this is because it began and continues its secret existence through a “host of errors and phantasms.” We want historians to confirmour belief that the present rests upon profound intentions and immutable necessities. But the true historical sense confirms our existence among countless lost events, without a landmark or a point of reference.’
Found—
'From these… traits of historical meaning…
An entire… tradition… aims at dissolving…
ideal continuity… as a… natural process.

…however, … their most … acute manifestations…,
consequently, … battle… forces… of… a vocabulary
turned against… a feeble domination that poisons…
the entry of a … regulative mechanism…

do… manifest… attraction…
not… a conclusion… through… randomness of…
the Christian… spider… folly… kingdom, … where
there is… the dice-box of… will… power, and…
the risk of an… ultimately simple… final value.

a profusion of… marvelous… secret… errors…
confirm our… profound… necessities.

… true… sense confirms our… lost… reference.'
It WAS.